1. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  2. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  3. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  4. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  5. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  6. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  7. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  8. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  9. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  10. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  11. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  12. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  13. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  14. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  15. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  16. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  17. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  18. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  19. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  20. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  21. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  22. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  23. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  24. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  25. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  26. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  27. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  28. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal

Alumni Advice

The UCF English Department recently conducted a survey of program graduates, reflecting on the skills that were learned and their impact on careers after graduation. This webpage is a resource for current students to receive useful advice from a variety of career settings, with tips to better plan for success after graduation.

PROMPT: "Please provide a brief summary of how your experience as an English major impacted your success after graduation."


  • *Versatile Skills*

  • "My writing skills helped me achieve a better position within my organization."
    - JahKiya; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2000.

  • "My analytical skills improved ten-fold. My research, writing, and presentation skills also improved greatly."
    – Mike; B.A. Literature Track, 2012.

  • "Using the skills I learned as an English major, I was able to obtain a job as a copy editor for a large publishing company. When the publisher downsized, the copy editing department was eliminated but I was fortunate to have made a contact there who had transitioned to a position at the UCF College of Medicine. It has been personally satisfying to return to my alma mater and be of service to UCF using the skills I acquired here as an English major."
    – Lucia; B.A. Literature Track, 2002.

  • "Helped with my communication skills, written and oral. Provided a base for editing and working on publications."
    – Natasha; B.A. Literature Track, 2006.

  • "Good reading and writing practice."
    – Christina; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2012.

  • "I spend most of my day communicating with various departments in my current position. All of those papers really honed my writing skills."
    – Roger; B.A. Literature Track, 2009.

  • "While my current job is not related to my major the critical analysis, communication, and computer skills are applicable to any job so in this way my degree has been helpful."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2013.

  • "Being an English major help me gain confidence in many skills that are required in my current career in higher education - such as writing (emails, publications, etc.), analysis of written work (articles, reports, etc.), presentations, etc. This confidence has helped me succeed in my job."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 1994.

  • "Written and verbal communications skills are very important anywhere. Understanding how to communicate to diverse audiences has been crucial to my success. Learning to write concisely, paying attention to writing style, and choosing my words carefully, have greatly aided me in composing and answering emails (thousands of them), writing and editing documentation, and preparing for meetings and presentations."
    – Marcia; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2000.

  • "I think it gave me the critical thinking skills necessary in today's job market."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2011.

  • "An English degree is one of the best degrees on the market. If you can write, then you can do almost anything. I have been successful writing grant proposals that have brought over $100M in funding to UCF and the Central Florida area."
    – Jo Ann; B.A. Literature Track, 2001.

  • "Majoring in English taught me a variety of skills that I now use on a daily basis in the workplace. With such skills as technical writing and cross-cultural communication, my English degree has proved immensely useful in the workplace. The program also developed my "soft skills", building the habits of careful planning and attention to detail. Additionally, through the program, I formed a professional network that I expect will help me throughout my career, and friendships with classmates that I expect to last a lifetime."
    – Daniel; B.A. Technical Communication Track (Honors), 2009.



  • Creating Opportunities

  • "As I had been a part-time instructor at a local community college, the graduate degree allowed me to apply for and receive a full-time position."
    – Anonymous; M.A. Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies, 2010.

  • "My degree is completely responsible for my being hired as an instructor in a college, and my service learning and literature courses exposed me to the concept of diversity, which is what led me to decide to pursue a MSW degree."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Creative Writing Track (Honors), 2006.

  • "After finishing my MFA I was immediately promoted to full professor, and I now chair my program. My time at UCF helped me to develop as an educator, student, and writer, and for that I am very grateful."
    – Robin; M.F.A. Creative Writing, 2008.

  • "My MFA allowed me to teach a broader selection of courses. The degree experience played a key role in my becoming active in the literary community— ranging from AWP to active publishing and reading of my own work."
    – Jonathan; M.F.A. Creative Writing, 2011.

  • "I have proven myself to be a competent human being, and that I can read and write well."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2013.

  • "It made all the difference in the world. I am who I am today because I decided to major in English at UCF."
    – Jacki; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2013.

  • "It really didn't help as far as the major itself, but the degree has opened many doors."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2013.

  • "My experience as an English major gave me the skills necessary to succeed in the workplace. I learned how to use the technical language required by my profession as well as the professionalism needed to enhance my position."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2012.

  • "The program best provides students with the ability to critically think about more than their current knowledge base, write and learn to write effectively in all fields, and extensive research practice lends toward professional development and research within chosen field."
    – Tanner; B.A. Literature Track, 2011. M.A. Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies, 2013.



  • *Specialized Skills*

  • "I am working at one of the country's largest book publishing companies. With the skills I learned at UCF (specifically through The Florida Review class) I was completely prepared for what my job would ask of me."
    – Rachel; B.A. Literature Track, 2013.

  • "The Technical Writing program provided me the skill sets and tools to work in a business environment by virtue of the class projects, the writing assignments, and the lessons. Technology has changed but the essentials (clear communication, excellent grammar and writing skills) are still the same and critical to any business."
    – Molly; M.A. Technical Communication, 1996.

  • "The technical writing program is extremely focused on real world experience. Working in teams, developing guides and performing work for clients while at UCF were key to landing my first job after graduation."
    – Gary; B.A. Technical Writing, 1995.

  • "While I majored in Creative Writing the training and skills I have acquired have improved my ability to communicate my ideas and present well written documents."
    – Penny; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2008.

  • "English is important and employers still value good grammar, a broad vocabulary, and great writing skills. In my current job, I am designing marketing tools and writing A LOT. My classes at UCF have helped to prepare me for the real world."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2010. M.A. Technical Communication, 2012.

  • "Writing skills are very useful in law school and the legal field."
    – Terry; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2009.





  • PROMPT: "What is the most important advice you can give to English students about CAREER success after graduation?"


    *Networking Connections*


  • "I would have to say network while in school with peers, professors, and community leaders. Set a vision or plan for your career and chase it. Make sure to not only communicate with people, but connect."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2013.

  • "I would encourage incoming/current English students who envision a career path outside of academia to seek internship opportunities while still in college, as those often lead to permanent positions after graduation."
    – Lucia; B.A. Literature Track, 2002.

  • "Taking more time to finish a degree with experience is better than finishing a degree quickly without experience."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2013.

  • "Get involved, know your options, do some research...intern, intern, intern....this way you can build a stellar resume and make connections, which in return will help you get the job you want."
    – Natasha; B.A. Literature Track, 2006.

  • "Practice interviewing, and go for any internships."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2012.

  • "Do an internship. You need experience writing in a field. Learn how to incorporate your writing skills in technology and social media. Technical writing skills are in demand."
    – Jo Ann; B.A. Literature Track, 2001.

  • "Do internships during college! Every semester you can. It takes a while to find a job after graduation, and internship experience will bump up your chances tenfold. I don't think I would have been able to get a job at all if it weren't for my internships."
    – Jacki; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2013.

  • "It's best to apply to a job where you can speak with a real person."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2012.

  • "If you want to teach, adjunct as soon as possible. Also, teach at UCF in the graduate program."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2008. M.A. Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies, 2010.



  • *Proactive Planning*

  • "Read trade publications and network with people in the field to get a better understanding of the field and opportunities that are available."
    – Gary; B.A. Technical Writing, 1995.

  • "Your first job may not be your dream job. As an English major it is sometimes more difficult to find a job without a minor or double major in another field. However, if you stay connected with alumni and continue to learn, even while working, you become better prepared for present and future career paths."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2012.

  • "Have a close relationship with your advisor so that you can have the assistance that you will need in making career decisions. Do research on different careers you might want, job shadow/intern if possible."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2011.

  • "Start looking for jobs the semester before you graduate. Go to AWP and network like crazy. Networking is what will make or break you. Make yourself stand out. Do whatever you can to put yourself out there. Yes, it's exhausting. But it is worth it."
    – Leslie; M.F.A. Creative Writing, 2013.

  • "Listen carefully and learn as much as you can about your business, the organization, and processes (not just your "widget"). Provide input when appropriate. Look for ways to improve the company, not just your career. Show that you have a passion for your work and your career will fall into place."
    – Molly; M.A. Technical Communication, 1996.

  • "Find things that excite you that are outside of the standard major in English lit. Look for opportunities in all different places."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2013.

  • "Double major in an additional field to increase your hirability. English is an invaluable major as it increases awareness of people and it proves communication skills but many employers will overlook it for what they consider more academic majors."
    – Roger; B.A. Literature Track, 2009.

  • "A degree in English can be extremely valuable in a variety of career choices after graduation. Do not limit yourself to careers in teaching, editing, etc. Be open to non-traditional ways your degree can apply and help you be successful."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 1994.

  • "Don't underestimate the importance of making yourself understood through the written or spoken word. Being understood is vital to your success in the workplace. Your career may begin with resumes and networking, as well as social media and web presence. These are all communication avenues to that desired job. Don't underestimate the skills that you (as an English major) have that others may not possess. What you learn really does apply in the working world--not just as an editor of other people's resumes."
    – Marcia; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2000.

  • "When you study English, you get out what you put into it; you won't see much success by just showing up to class. Engage academically by taking on independent study and programs like Honors in the Major. Engage professionally with networking and internships. Engage socially by getting to know your classmates, and joining student organizations."
    – Daniel; B.A. Technical Communication Track (Honors), 2009.



  • *Skill-Building*


  • "The ability to write well is the single most important skill that they should acquire - the ability to analyze what you read is next."
    – Penny; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2008.

  • "Hone your skills in real world applications. The modern workplace is constantly evolving and is very competitive. Writing and editing skills are more valuable than ever. Understanding of tone, nuances, sentence structure, etc. are valuable to many employers. Also freelance writing and editing opportunities are available within the community. Business clients need writers for their website content, promotional materials, etc. Networking is key."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2009.

  • "Supplement your English degree with a minor that will give you technical skills applicable to your chosen career path."
    – Anonymous; Minor: Technical Communication, 2011.

  • "Be sure to take computer courses and learn appropriate programs, especially as they apply to designing and layout if you intend to pursue magazine journalism."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Creative Writing Track (Honors), 2006.

  • "Independently research the skills required for technical writer positions as well as the varieties of technical writing duties."
    – Anonymous; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2010.

  • "Don't be afraid of change. For tech comm students - Embrace technology and push yourself to learn every day on the job. The more you know, the more dangerous you'll be."
    – Shannon; B.A. Technical Communication Track, Minor: Literature, 2010.

  • "Recognize the value of composition and analysis skills in the workplace."
    - JahKiya; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2000.

  • "Learn technical programs and become really comfortable with the computer...minor in business if possible. Business skills are sought after in the real world. Business and Technology. My degree has helped me in communication and diversity."
    - Anonymous; B.A. Technical Communication Track, 2009.

  • "Finding a career is not always easy. My advice: DO NOT GIVE UP. The jobs are out there, you just need to take the time to find them. If you are not fully employed when you graduate, start applying to jobs full time (you only have six months before loan payments kick in!). If you spend eight hours each day applying to positions online, I promise you will find a job."
    - Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2010. M.A. Technical Communication, 2012.



  • *Staying Engaged*


  • "Critically think about the process and decisions your employer(s) make which will help determine why/how these decisions were made. Doing so will allow you to navigate workplace politics and provide opportunities to constructively improve your career."
    – Tanner; B.A. Literature Track, 2011. M.A. Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies, 2013.

  • "ATTEND EVERY INTERVIEW. I attended an interview to be the new office assistant at a real estate office and they hired me to work in their marketing department instead. You never know what each interview will hold."
    - Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2010. M.A. Technical Communication, 2012.

  • "Understanding that it may be a tough job market but these skills will aid for a life time not just for the interview."
    - Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2011.

  • "Go for the job you really want, not just the one you think you can get."
    - Anonymous; B.A. Literature Track, 2013.

  • "Keep writing and never stop. Further your education and be realistic in your goals."
    - Myna; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2007.

  • "Take advantage of the opportunities, as you can, which your instructors offer you, volunteer, give feedback, stay in-the-loop."
    – Jude; B.A. Creative Writing Track, 2012.

  • "For those entering the work force, I definitely suggest you let go of your sense of entitlement and ego. Start scheduling now to make time for writing, if you can't plan for it now, you won't make time after graduation either. Look for any opportunities to use your writing skills in the workplace. Once folks know your skills it opens more potential for opportunity to ply your craft."
    – Robin; M.F.A. Creative Writing, 2008.

  • "This is about you, your work and your attitude. The degree will open doors, but the job is earned by the person, not the paper. Be proactive throughout your degree program. Do not wait until six weeks before your graduation to start thinking about jobs. Get involved in your degree community. Join clubs, volunteer, shake hands and meet people, that's how you get hired."
    – Jonathan; M.F.A. Creative Writing, 2011.

  • "Go for what you want. Don't settle just because others say there isn't a place for English majors in the workplace. THERE IS."
    – Rachel; B.A. Literature Track, 2013.




  • Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
    Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu