1. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  2. The Night We Set the Dead Kid on Fire by Ephraim
  3. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  4. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  5. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
Department of English Graduate Programs

Francois-Xavier Gleyzon, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. from University of Lancaster - United Kingdom (2008)

Courses

No courses found for Spring 2018.

No courses found for Fall 2017.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50947 LIT6216 Issues in Literary Study Web B Web Not Online
The course focuses on early modern English literatures/cultures and contemporary cultural/visual theories. We will read works of fiction, prose, and plays by Thomas More, Thomas Wyatt, Edmund Spenser, Robert Burton, George Herbert, William Shakespeare, and John Milton. Several segments of the course focus on the re-construction and re-presentation of the human body - including a critical investigation of anatomy as a visual concept (the Icarian/cartographic gaze), and how early cartographic practice reveals a striking iconic correlation between maps and the (female) body (Robert Burton). Specific seminars will also explore how the acts of creating/writing are themselves devices for fashioning the body and identity (Wyatt), positioning the self within a social and religious order as well as defining the otherness of gender (Shakespeare). Undertaking close readings of specific renaissance/early modern texts as well as visual artefacts such as films and paintings, the course provides a unique insight into Early Modern’s visual culture and helps refashion, re-map broader issues that engage the then emergent status of cultural and religious identity, nation, and individuality.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10980 LIT6216 Issues in Literary Study Face2Face W 7:30PM - 10:15PM Not Online
LIT6216.0001: ISSUES IN LCT: VISUAL SHAKESPEARE
(Gleyzon)

PR: Graduate standing in English

Course Description:
“Drama is first and foremost a Visual Art” (Al Pacino, Sight and Sound, 2007). This course explores such issues as the way the visual contests the printed word, or the way it figures class and gender issues, or occupies the spaces of theatricality, fashion, landscape, the marketplace and the production of texts. It examines the process of translating Shakespeare's language into images, and offers specific ways of both understanding/penetrating and visualizing Shakespeare’s world. Shakespeare’s stage and concern was indeed The Globe, and central to the goal of this course is the careful scrutiny of Shakespeare's plays in relation both to early modern visual culture and to modern film versions and their world-wide reception.

Undertaking close readings of specific Shakespeare’s texts as well as visual artifacts such as films and paintings, the course provides a unique insight into Shakespeare and Early Modern’s visual culture and helps refashion, re-map broader issues that engage the then emergent status of cultural and religious identity, nation, and individuality. Finally, the course argues for the critical importance of thinking Shakespeare now. We will therefore consider what Shakespeare has to offer now (in an age of visual/global cultures) and in the future.

Plays include specifically Richard II, Richard III, King Lear, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, The Merchant of Venice, and Romeo and Juliet, supplemented by readings on Shakespearean criticism and contemporary theory.

No courses found for Fall 2016.

No courses found for Summer 2016.

Updated: Aug 15, 2017

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • english@ucf.edu