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  2. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
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Department of English Graduate Programs
Sonia H. Stephens

Sonia H. Stephens, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Texts and Technology from University of Central FLorida (2012)
  • M.S. in Botany and Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from University of Hawaii at Manoa (2003)

Research Interests

Scientific and Technical Communication in Digital and visual Media; Narrative Information Visualization; Visual Risk Communication; Visual Metaphor; User Evaluation of Interactive Tools; Digital Humanities

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • S. H. Stephens, D. E. DeLorme and S. C. Hagen. (2017) "Evaluation of the design features of interactive sea-level rise viewers for risk communication." Environmental Communication. 11(2):248-262. DOI:10.1080/17524032.2016.1167758
  • D. E. DeLorme, D. Kidwell, S. C. Hagen, and S. H. Stephens. (2016) “Developing and managing transdisciplinary and transformative research on the coastal dynamics of sea level rise: Experiences and lessons learned.” Earth’s Future.
    4(5): 194–209. DOI: 10.1002/2015EF000346.

  • S. H. Stephens, D. E. DeLorme and S. C. Hagen. (2015) “Evaluating the utility and communicative effectiveness of an interactive sea level rise viewer through stakeholder engagement.” Journal of Business and Technical Communication. 29(3): 314-343. DOI: 10.1177/1050651915573963

  • S. H. Stephens, D. E. DeLorme and S. C. Hagen. (2014) “An analysis of the narrative-building features of interactive sea level rise viewers.” Science Communication. 36(6): 675-705. DOI: 10.1177/1075547014550371

  • S. H. Stephens. (2014) “Communicating evolution with a Dynamic Evolutionary Map.” Journal of Science Communication. 13(1): A04.

  • S. Stephens. (2012) “From tree to map: Using cognitive learning theory to suggest alternative ways to visualize macroevolution.” Evolution: Education and Outreach. 5(4): 603-618.

Conference Papers/Presentations

  • S. Stephens and J. D. Applen, October 2016. “Rhetorical dimensions of social network analysis visualization for public health.” ProComm 2016, Austin TX.
  • S. H. Stephens and D. E. DeLorme, June 2016. “Making sea level rise risk research responsive to community needs.” Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Washington, DC.
  • S. H. Stephens, May 2016. “Bird identification guides as interface: Transformation and continuity.” Rhetoric Society of America, Atlanta, GA.

  • M. Shelton and S. Stephens, February 2016. “Connecting scientists to citizens regarding sea level rise.” Social Coast Forum, Charleston, SC.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19463 ENG6808 Narrative Info Visualization Face2Face Tu 6:00PM - 8:50PM Not Online
In this course, we will explore narrative information visualization, or how to tell visual stories about data. Narrative visualizations engage audiences and tell a story using features like interactive maps, infographics, and timelines. Visualization designers make choices about selecting and representing data, developing a narrative, and shaping their audiences’ interpretation of the underlying information. This course is recommended for students who want to learn skills that can be applied to digital humanities, visual communication, science communication, and/or digital history projects. Examples could include mapping Orlando civil rights history, telling a story about trends in social media content, or visualizing the links between different fandoms.

This course has theoretical and hands-on components. You will first explore information visualization from an interdisciplinary perspective, learning how to understand and critique visualizations using rhetoric, critical theory, graphic design, and cognitive science concepts. You will then create a hands-on interactive visualization project using data of your choice. Projects may involve working with text, visuals, numerical data, or map-based data. No coding experience is necessary, as several “off-the shelf” tools are available to help build these projects.

No courses found for Fall 2016.

No courses found for Summer 2016.

Updated: Jan 31, 2017

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • english@ucf.edu