1. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  2. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  3. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  4. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  5. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  6. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  7. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  8. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  9. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  10. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  11. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  12. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  13. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  14. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  15. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  16. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  17. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  18. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  19. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  20. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  21. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  22. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  23. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  24. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  25. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  26. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  27. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  28. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  29. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  30. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  31. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath

Victoria Polk

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10062 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Face2Face Tu,Th 3:00PM - 4:15PM Not Online

AML 3031.0001: American Literature II (Polk)

Spring 2018

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102; ENG 3014 is highly recommended

This survey course is designed to introduce you to a wide and rich variety of literature from the period of colonization to the mid-19th century, including works representing some of the diverse ethnic and racial strands of our literary heritage such as slave narratives, Native American literature and women writers. Since this course covers writings from Native American sources through the Civil War, we will become familiar with the contextual circumstances surrounding the production of a given text and explore the development and expression of some fundamental ideas—-assumptions, myths, and beliefs—that still influence the ways Americans think about themselves and their society. In addition to studying a range of prose, poetry, and fictional works, we study what it means to work within the “contact zone,” to be an American, and explore the canon of early American literature through aesthetic, rhetorical, and literary themes. The course uses You Tube, film, and other media as part of its instruction. 



10771 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Web Web Not Online

AML 3041.0W61: American Literature II (Polk)

Spring 2018

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102; ENG 3014 is highly recommended

This survey course is designed to introduce you to a wide and rich variety of literature from the period of Twain to present, including works representing some of the diverse ethnic and racial strands of our literary heritage. We will become familiar with the contextual circumstances surrounding the production of a given text and explore the development and expression of some fundamental ideas—-assumptions, myths, and beliefs—that still influence the ways Americans think about themselves and their society. In addition to studying a range of prose, poetry, and fictional works, we study what it means to be an American, and explore the canon of mid-to current American literature through aesthetic, rhetorical, and literary themes. The course uses You Tube, film, and other media as part of its instruction. This is a web course.



11314 LIT3212 Research & Writing About Lit Face2Face Tu,Th 1:30PM - 2:45PM Not Online

LIT 3212.0001: Research and Writing About Literature (Polk)

Spring 2018

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102; ENG 3014 is highly recommended

This course is designed to prepare English majors and minors to succeed in the research process of their upper-level literature courses. Readings of literature is organized around the theme of “marginalized narratives” (a mere sample) and the concepts of “identity,” “home,” and “revolution” to name a few. Students will acquire valuable research, writing, critical analysis and synthesis skills through intensive study of research methods, scholarly essays, database familiarity, and peer review paired alongside the assigned literature. The first half of the semester covers the literature, the second half involves the development of the 10-12 page research paper that will be developed throughout the semester in research installments. Students will be expected to conduct independent research and to write and read frequently and critically on topics related to literary research and writing.


Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81551 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Rdce Time M,W 1:30PM - 2:20PM Not Online
AML 3031.0002: American Literature I
(Kamrath)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This survey course is designed to introduce you to a wide and rich variety of literature from the period of colonization to the mid-19th century, including works representing some of the diverse ethnic and racial strands of our literary heritage as well as texts by women writers frequently excluded from literary collections. Since this course covers writings from Native American sources through the Civil War, we will become familiar with the historical circumstances surrounding the production of a given text and explore the development and expression of some fundamental ideas—-assumptions, myths, and beliefs—that still influence the ways Americans think about themselves and their society. In addition to studying a range of prose, poetry, and fictional works, we will also closely examine their aesthetic or rhetorical dimensions and practice ways of identifying representative issues and themes. The course uses You Tube, film, and other media as part of its instruction.

Course requirements include weekly reading and discussion; several brief essays, along with a 6-7 page critical paper, and a mid-term and final examination. (Note: To enroll in this course you must have previously taken ENC1101 and ENC 1102. ENG 3014 is highly recommended. This course satisfies the “Literary History” requirement)
91261 AML3615 Harlem, Haiti, and Havana Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
81822 LIT3192 Caribbean Literature Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
62290 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web B Web Not Online
No Description Available