1. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  2. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  3. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  4. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  5. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  6. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  7. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  8. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  9. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  10. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  11. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  12. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  13. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  14. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  15. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  16. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  17. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  18. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  19. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  20. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  21. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  22. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  23. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  24. The Night We Set the Dead Kid on Fire by Ephraim
  25. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  26. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  27. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  28. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  29. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  30. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
Beth Rapp Young

Beth Rapp Young, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in English (Rhetoric, Linguistics, and Literature Program) from University of Southern California (1995)
  • M.A. in English from University of Southern California (1990)
  • B.A. in English from Rollins College (1987)

Research Interests

  • rhetoric
  • composition
  • linguistics (particularly corpus linguistics)
  • grammar / usage
  • expert witness 

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • Young, Beth Rapp. “Prescriptivism, Grammar Checkers, and That vs. Which: How Our Tools Influence Our Rules.” ATEG Journal 24:1 (Summer 2015): 28-43.

  • Young, Beth Rapp. “Using Archival Data to Examine Mandatory Visits.” Academic Exchange Quarterly (Winter 2014). 49-56. [national refereed journal] Reprinted in Sound Instruction: Writing Center Theory and Practice, vol. 4. Ed. Kellie A. Charron. 80-86.

  • Young, Beth Rapp. “The Grammar Voyeur: Using Google to Teach English Grammar to Advanced Undergraduates.”  American Speech 86 (Summer 2011): 247-258. [national refereed journal]

Conference Papers/Presentations

  • Young, Beth Rapp. “Grammar Checkers Enforce Prescriptivism: A That/Which Timeline.” Poster. Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), Tampa, 19-21 March, 2015.

  • Young, Beth Rapp. “Using Online Corpora to Research Contemporary Usage.” Digital Pedagogy Poster. CCCC, Tampa, 21 March, 2015.
  • Young, Beth Rapp. “Reviewing the Grammar Cops.” Assembly for Teachers of English Grammar (ATEG) 25th Annual Conference, Colorado Springs, CO, 4 September 2014.
  • Young, Beth Rapp, and Kimberly Murray. “To Require or Not to Require: A Longitudinal Analysis of Student Visits to the Writing Center. National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW), Miami, 5 November 2011.
  • Young, Beth Rapp. Panel Participant. "Tales from the Winner's Circle: Award-winning Online Faculty Discuss the Secrets of Their Success" Sloan-C ALN Conference, Orlando, 9 November 2011.
  • Young, Beth Rapp. “Activities for Teaching Grammar Online.” ATEG 22nd Annual Conference, Largo, MD, 29 July 2011. 
  • Young, Beth Rapp. “Do Errors Matter If We Don’t Notice Them? How Writing Teachers React to Error.” CCCC, Atlanta, 9 April 2011.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11241 LIN4105 History of the English Lang Web Web Available
No Description Available
19418 LIN5137 Linguistics Web Web Available
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81402 LIN3010 Principles of Linguistics Rdce Time Tu 1:30PM - 2:45PM Available
No Description Available
80847 LIN4105 History of the English Lang Rdce Time Th 9:00AM - 10:15AM Available
No Description Available
91256 LIN4680 Modern English Grammar Web Web Available
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
51085 LIN5137 Linguistics Web C Web Available
Do you use friend as a verb? Why do some people say aks and not ask? How many different ways can you use the word like? When does "I'm busy" mean "no"? Will txting make us talk in abbrevs?

In this course, we will connect technical linguistic information to your daily experiences with language. We will learn and practice techniques for describing English, from its sounds and words and sentences and larger elements of discourse in context. We will develop an intimate working knowledge of several dictionaries, including the OED. We will investigate linguistics issues empirically with research corpora. In linguistic terms, we'll cover phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and lexicography.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11303 LIN4105 History of the English Lang Web Web Available
LIN4105.0W61: History of the English Language
(Young)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and sophomore standing

How did English get this way? Why is English different in different English-speaking countries, such as England, Australia, the USA, and Canada? Why is English spelling so crazy? Is English a Romance language? Where do our words come from? Who decides which kind of English is 'best'? Why don't people use the language properly?

These questions and others are answered in this course, which traces the development of English from its earliest roots to an obscure dialect of Northern Europe spoken by a few thousand people to a world language spoken and used daily by hundreds of millions. We'll address the internal development of the language (sounds, aka phonology; writing, aka graphemics; grammar, aka morphology & syntax; meaning, aka semantics; spelling, aka orthography; and other points of usage). We'll also address the significant external historical events that have influenced the English language. By the end of the class, you should understand the processes that have changed English in the past and that are still changing English in the present.

Because this course covers a vast amount of material, you should expect to complete dense reading assignments, numerous homework assignments, and challenging exams. Because this course is designated as “W – Web Only,” you’ll never be required to meet face-to-face.
19192 LIN5675 English Grammar and Usage Web Web Available
LIN5675.0W61: English Grammar and Usage
(Young)

PR: Graduate status or senior standing

Every company has at least one "grammar expert" who picks through prose looking for errors. Your company may even expect you to be that expert. If this prospect makes you nervous, you need this course! This course will teach you the fundamentals of English grammar. You'll also learn the difference between grammatical rules and folklore rules, so that you can safely navigate tricky passages when the rules aren't clear.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to:
* Use grammar terminology correctly
* Analyze the grammatical structure of sentences within English texts, identifying various structures (e.g., prepositional phrases) and explaining their functions within the sentence
* Locate specific grammar elements in real-world texts
* Write texts that correctly use specific grammar elements
* Demonstrate knowledge of how sentence-level grammar contributes to the coherence of paragraphs and texts
* Understand and appreciate the natural variation that occurs in language across time, social situation, and social group, while recognizing the need for mastering standard English
* Conduct basic research using digital language corpora
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81517 LIN3010 Principles of Linguistics Rdce Time Tu 1:30PM - 2:45PM Available
LIN3010.0M01: Principles of Linguistics
(Young)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

Do you use "friend" as a verb? Why do some people say "aks" and not "ask"? How many different ways can you use the word "like"? When does "I'm busy" mean "no"? Will txting make us talk in abbrevs?

In this course, we will study the English language: how we use it; how it uses us. We will connect technical linguistic information to your daily experiences with language. We will learn and practice techniques for describing English, both its words and sentences and larger elements of discourse in context. We will look at the social, historical, and political forces that shape language and its use. We will explore how linguistic issues can be empirically investigated with digital research tools. And we will suggest ways to use what we learn about language both in the classroom and in the professional world. In linguistic terms, we'll cover phonology, morphology, semantics, pragmatics, speech act theory, and stylistics.
80916 LIN4105 History of the English Lang Rdce Time Th 9:00AM - 10:15AM Not Online
LIN4105.0M01: History of the English Language

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and sophomore standing

How did English get this way? Why is English different in different English-speaking countries, such as England, Australia, the USA, and Canada? Why is English spelling so crazy? Is English a Romance language? Where do our words come from? Who decides which kind of English is "best"? Why don't people use the language properly?

These questions and others are answered in this course, which traces the development of English from its earliest roots to an obscure dialect of Northern Europe spoken by a few thousand people to a world language spoken and used daily by hundred of millions. We'll address the internal development of the language (sounds, aka phonology; writing, aka graphemics; grammar, aka morphology & syntax; meaning, aka semantics; spelling, aka orthography; and other points of usage). We'll also address the significant external historical events that have influenced the English language. By the end of the class, you should understand the processes that have changed English in the past and that are still changing English in the present.

Because this course covers a vast amount of material, you should expect to complete dense reading assignments, numerous homework assignments, and challenging exams.
81386 LIN4680 Modern English Grammar Web Web Available
LIN4680.0W61: Modern English Grammar
(Young)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and sophomore standing

Can you explain the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs? Between complements and objects? Between clauses and phrases? Between active and passive voice? This grammar class will teach you how. English grammar is a fascinating subject that transcends questions such as, "Is it ok to end a sentence with a preposition?" Even the simple rules are not as simple as you might think. Experts often disagree, for example, where to put the comma. Unfortunately, many self-appointed grammar cops know little about how the English language actually works.

If you're a native speaker of English, in one sense you're already an expert. However, this expertise is "innate"--it isn't conscious knowledge, but subconscious knowledge. In this class, you'll learn to consciously understand how your language works so you can enhance your own communication skills.

Making the transition from subconscious to conscious knowledge may not be easy. For one thing, whatever conscious knowledge you already have may actually be clouded by inaccuracies, even folklore. Since this class is based on research about how good speakers and writers actually use English, you may find it difficult because it's not what you're use to. For another, making the transition from conscious knowledge will require frequent practice. Because of this, you'll be expected to complete several assignments every week, and you'll be encouraged to complete additional practice exercises on your own.

Please note: Writers benefit from studying grammar in the same way that athletes benefit form studying anatomy. Grammar isn't a "how to writer" class any more than anatomy is a "how to play your sport" class, but knowing how English works can help you write more effectively.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61215 LIN5137 Linguistics Web C Web Not Online
LIN5137.CW61: Linguistics
(Young)

PR: Graduate status or senior standing

Do you use friend as a verb? Why do some people say aks and not ask? How many different ways can you use the word like? When does "I'm busy" mean "no"? Will txting make us talk in abbrevs?

In this course, we will connect technical linguistic information to your daily experiences with language. We will learn and practice techniques for describing English, from its sounds and words and sentences and larger elements of discourse in context. We will develop an intimate working knowledge of several dictionaries, including the OED. We will investigate linguistics issues empirically with research corpora. In linguistic terms, we'll cover phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and lexicography.

Updated: Apr 7, 2017

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu