1. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  2. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  3. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  4. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  5. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  6. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  7. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  8. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  9. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  10. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  11. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  12. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  13. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  14. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  15. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  16. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  17. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  18. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  19. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  20. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  21. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  22. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  23. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  24. The Night We Set the Dead Kid on Fire by Ephraim
  25. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  26. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  27. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  28. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  29. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  30. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
Lynn A. Casmier-Paz

Lynn A. Casmier-Paz

Research Interests

  • African American Slave Narratives
  • Autobiography and Life Writing Studies
  • Literacy Studies
  • Literary Theory

Awards

Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship

Stephen Botein Fellowship: American Antiquarian Society

Courses

No courses found for Spring 2018.

No courses found for Fall 2017.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50974 AML3613 Narratives of Slavery Web A Web Not Online
AML3613.AW60: Narratives of Slavery
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This literature course will examine the stories of American literature that focus specifically upon the institution of chattel slavery between the 18th and 19th centuries. We will read narratives that were written by the ex-slaves, which were published during the slavery era. The course also requires reading about the narratives in the form of critical essays that put the stories into their historical and literary contexts.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11527 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
AML3031.0W61: American Literature I
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This semester-long Web course survey of American Literature will examine the most influential and significant writings of the United States, which were produced between the 15th century and the Civil War. The course is organized thematically, rather than chronologically. As such the texts we will read present the emergence of both a nation and its identity. The course will include readings from the Norton Anthology of American Literature Vols. A & B and online essays/articles.
19187 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Rdce Time Th 1:30PM - 2:45PM Not Online
ENG3014.0M03: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and junior standing

This course will address the questions surrounding the ways we read, and the possible interpretations of texts. Through shared readings, writing assignments, discussion postings, quizzes, and Power Point lectures, we will be prepared to interpret and write about literature in many ways. The readings will proceed from a historical survey of major critical approaches to interpretation as found in the Bressler textbook.

Because this is a theory course, the heavy reading requirement is the highest priority, and probably the most difficult aspect of the course. After we read a survey of literary theories and approaches to reading, we will use the novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, as our "guinea pig," to which we will apply the techniques and approaches we've read. It is important that you keep up with the readings in order to participate in your group's discussions, and so that you may do well on the writings, quizzes, and exams.
19188 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Rdce Time Th 9:00AM - 10:15AM Not Online
ENG3014.0M04: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and junior standing

This course will address the questions surrounding the ways we read, and the possible interpretations of texts. Through shared readings, writing assignments, discussion postings, quizzes, and Power Point lectures, we will be prepared to interpret and write about literature in many ways. The readings will proceed from a historical survey of major critical approaches to interpretation as found in the Bressler textbook.

Because this is a theory course, the heavy reading requirement is the highest priority, and probably the most difficult aspect of the course. After we read a survey of literary theories and approaches to reading, we will use the novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, as our "guinea pig," to which we will apply the techniques and approaches we've read. It is important that you keep up with the readings in order to participate in your group's discussions, and so that you may do well on the writings, quizzes, and exams.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
80914 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
AML3031.0W61: American Literature I
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This semester-long Web course survey of American Literature will examine the most influential and significant writings of the United States, which were produced between the 15th century and the Civil War. The course is organized thematically, rather than chronologically. As such the texts we will read present the emergence of both a nation and its identity. The course will include readings from the Norton Anthology of American Literature Vols. A & B and online essays/articles.
81201 AML3613 Narratives of Slavery Rdce Time Th 1:30PM - 2:45PM Not Online
AML3613.0M01: Narratives of Slavery
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This literature course will examine the stories of American literature that focus specifically upon the institution of chattel slavery between the 18th and 19th centuries. We will read narratives that were written by ex-slaves and others, which were published during the slavery era. We will also read selected "neo-slave narratives" that have been published since slavery was ended after the Civil War. The course will also feature selected films, which represent slavery in ways that attempt to revise the historical knowledge about slavery. In this way, the course will become a comparative, historical, and theoretical examination of themes, topics, ideas, and perspectives--all of which will be firmly grounded in theories about story-telling, or narrative.
81384 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Rdce Time Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM Not Online
ENG3014.0M02: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and junior standing

This course will address the questions surrounding the ways we read, and the possible interpretations of texts. Through shared readings, writing assignments, discussion postings, quizzes, and Power Point lectures, we will be prepared to interpret and write about literature in many ways. The readings will proceed from a historical survey of major critical approaches to interpretation as found in the Bressler textbook.

Because this is a theory course, the heavy reading requirement is the highest priority, and probably the most difficult aspect of the course. After we read a survey of literary theories and approaches to reading, we will use the novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, as our "guinea pig," to which we will apply the techniques and approaches we've read. It is important that you keep up with the readings in order to participate in your group's discussions, and so that you may do well on the writings, quizzes, and exams.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
51051 AML3613 Narratives of Slavery Web A Web Not Online
AML3613.AW59: Narratives of Slavery
(Casmier-Paz)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This Web literature course will examine the stories of American literature that focus specifically upon the institution of chattel slavery from the 18th through 21st centuries. We will read antebellum narratives that were written by the ex-slaves and the modern literary theories that have helped us understand them. In this way the course will be a historical, theoretical examination of themes, topics, ideas, and perspectives--all of which will be firmly grounded in theories about story-telling, or narrative.

The class will be led primarily by independent reading, PowerPoint teacher lectures, and short writing assignments. The writing assignments will be an opportunity to reflect on the PowerPoint lectures, readings--including critical essays--and to ask questions. Regularly scheduled quizzes and exams are designed to enable students to stay up with the readings.

Updated: Sep 28, 2015

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu