1. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  2. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  3. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  4. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  5. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  6. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  7. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  8. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  9. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  10. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  11. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  12. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  13. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  14. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  15. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  16. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  17. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  18. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  19. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  20. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  21. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  22. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  23. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  24. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  25. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  26. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  27. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  28. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  29. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  30. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  31. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
Lynn A. Casmier-Paz

Lynn A. Casmier-Paz

Research Interests

  • African American Slave Narratives
  • Autobiography and Life Writing Studies
  • Literacy Studies
  • Literary Theory

Awards

Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship

Stephen Botein Fellowship: American Antiquarian Society

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19251 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online

   This Web course survey of American Literature will examine the most influential and significant writings of the United States, which were produced between the 15th century and the Civil War. The course is organized thematically, rather than chronologically. As such the texts we will read present the emergence of both a nation and its identity. The course will include readings from the Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. 1 (Shorter Eighth Edition) and online essays/articles. Prereq: ENC1101 and ENC11102.

19253 AML3613 Narratives of Slavery Rdce Time Tu 9:00AM - 10:15AM Not Online
No Description Available
20619 AML3613 Narratives of Slavery Web Web Not Online

This Web literature course will examine the stories of American literature that focus specifically upon the institution of chattel slavery from the 18th & 19th centuries. We will read narratives that were written by the ex-slaves and the modern literary theories that have helped us understand them. In this way the course will be an historical, theoretical examination of themes, topics, ideas, and perspectives--all of which will be firmly grounded in theories about story-telling, or narrative.

   The class will be led primarily by independent reading, Power Point teacher lectures, and short writing assignments. The writing assignments will be an opportunity to reflect on the Power Point lectures, readings--including the critical essays--and to ask questions. Regularly scheduled quizzes and exams are designed to enable students to stay up with the readings.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
91258 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online

   This Web course survey of American Literature will examine the most influential and significant writings of the United States, which were produced between the 15th century and the Civil War. The course is organized thematically, rather than chronologically. As such the texts we will read present the emergence of both a nation and its identity. The course will include readings from the Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. 1 (Shorter Eighth Edition) and online essays/articles. Prereq: ENC1101 and ENC11102.

92211 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online

This Web course survey of American Literature will examine the most influential and significant writings of the United States, which were produced between the 15th century and the Civil War. The course is organized thematically, rather than chronologically. As such the texts we will read present the emergence of both a nation and its identity. The course will include readings from the Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. 1 (Shorter Eighth Edition) and online essays/articles. Prereq: ENC1101 and ENC11102.

81753 LIT6936 Studies in Lct Theory Face2Face Tu,Th 6:00PM - 7:15PM Not Online

Course Description: LIT6936—Autobiography/Life Writing
 
This advanced graduate seminar will read genres and theories of autobiography/life writing and their exemplars in loosely historical order, from St. Augustine’s Confessions up to the myriad 21st century constructions of life writing on the Internet.
 
The assigned course readings of the first two-thirds of the term will focus primarily on theory and literary texts that reveal the emergence of modern identities from the ancient through early-modern eras up to the 21st century. In the last one-third of the term, students will
1.    Launch their own individual, guided research projects that read autobiographical texts in a chosen genre,
2.    Gather theoretically informed readings about those texts, and
3.    Write a formal conference paper, abstract, and annotated bibliography that they will submit for possible inclusion at local, national, and/or international autobiography/life writing conferences.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50803 AML3613 Narratives of Slavery Web A Web Not Online

   This Web literature course will examine the stories of American literature that focus specifically upon the institution of chattel slavery from the 18th & 19th centuries. We will read narratives that were written by the ex-slaves and the modern literary theories that have helped us understand them. In this way the course will be an historical, theoretical examination of themes, topics, ideas, and perspectives--all of which will be firmly grounded in theories about story-telling, or narrative.

   The class will be led primarily by independent reading, Power Point teacher lectures, and short writing assignments. The writing assignments will be an opportunity to reflect on the Power Point lectures, readings--including the critical essays--and to ask questions. Regularly scheduled quizzes and exams are designed to enable students to stay up with the readings.

No courses found for Spring 2018.

No courses found for Fall 2017.

Updated: Sep 19, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu