1. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  2. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  3. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  4. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  5. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  6. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  7. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  8. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  9. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  10. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  11. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  12. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  13. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  14. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  15. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  16. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  17. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  18. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  19. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  20. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  21. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  22. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  23. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  24. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  25. The Night We Set the Dead Kid on Fire by Ephraim
  26. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  27. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  28. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  29. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  30. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard

Anthony Grajeda, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Modern Studies, Department of English from The University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee (2001)

Selected Publications

Books

  • Music, Sound, and Technology in America: A Documentary History of Early Phonograph, Cinema, and Radio. Co-Edited by Timothy D. Taylor and Mark Katz. Duke University Press, 2012
  • Jay Beck and Tony Grajeda, editors, Lowering the Boom: Critical Studies in Film Sound (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008) and in translation: Chinese (Beijing: China Film Press, 2013)

Articles/Essays

  • “The ‘Sweet Spot’: The Technology of Stereo and the Field of Auditorship,” in eds., Paul Théberge, Kyle Devine, and Tom Everett, Living Stereo: Histories and Cultures of Multichannel Sound (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015), 37-63.

  • “Post-War Postponed: War without End, the Returning Soldier in American Cinema, and the Gendered Representation of Trauma,” Special Issue on “Media, Technology and the Culture of Militarism,” eds., Robin Andersen and Tanner Mirrlees, Democratic Communiqué (Vol. 26, No. 2, Fall 2014), 55-71.

  • “Early Mood Music: Edison’s Phonography, American Modernity and the Instrumentalization of Listening,” in Marta García Quiñones, Anahid Kassabian and Elena Boschi, eds., Ubiquitous Musics: The Everyday Sounds That We Don’t Always Notice (Farnham, U.K.: Ashgate, 2013), 31-47.

  •  “’A Question of the Ear’: Listening to Touch of Evil,” in Jay Beck and Tony Grajeda, eds., Lowering the Boom: Critical Studies in Film Sound (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008), 201-217.

  • “The Winning and Losing of Hearts and Minds: Vietnam, Iraq, and the Claims of the War Documentary,” Jump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media 49 (Spring 2007), 38 ms. pages; 41 web pages: http://www.ejumpcut.org/archive/jc49.2007/Grajeda/index.html.

  • “Picturing Torture: Gulf Wars Past and Present,” in Andrew Martin and Patrice Petro, eds., Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the “War on Terror” (New Brunswick, NJ and London: Rutgers University Press, 2006), 206-235.
  • “Disasterologies,” Social Epistemology: A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy, special issue on “After Social Construction: Technology, Knowledge, and Society” 19:4 (October-December  2005), 315-319.

  • "The Sound of Disaffection," in Henry Jenkins, Tara McPherson, and Jane Shattuc, eds., Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002), 357-375.

  • "The 'Feminization' of Rock," in Roger Beebe, Denise Fulbrook and Ben Saunders, eds., Rock Over the Edge: Transformations of Popular Music Culture (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002), 233-254.

Book Sections/Chapters

  • “Introduction: Cinema,” in Timothy D. Taylor, Mark Katz and Tony Grajeda, editors, Music, Sound, and Technology in America: A Documentary History of Early Phonograph, Cinema, and Radio (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2012), 137-44, 378-82.

  • Jay Beck and Tony Grajeda, “Introduction: The Future of Film Sound Studies,” in Beck and Grajeda, eds., Lowering the Boom: Critical Studies in Film Sound (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008), 1-20.

Miscellaneous Publications

  • Journals (Guest Editor)  

    Music, Sound, and the Moving Image 2:2 (Autumn 2008 [published 2009]), Special Issue on “The Future of Sound Studies,” co-edited with Jay Beck, with co-authored introduction, 109-114.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10745 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face2Face M,W,F 10:30AM - 11:20AM Not Online
No Description Available
10942 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face2Face M,W,F 11:30AM - 12:20PM Not Online
No Description Available

No courses found for Fall 2017.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50967 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web B Web Not Online
ENG3014:BW60: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Grajeda)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

“Theories of Literature” is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential “schools of thought” or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststucturalism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, and reader response criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. We will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10765 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face2Face M,W,F 10:30AM - 11:20AM Not Online
ENG3014.0001: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Grajeda)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and junior standing

"Theories of Literature" is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential "schools of thought" or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, reader response, and eco-criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. we will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to read texts from a variety of different critical perspectives and perform research at an appropriately advanced undergraduate level.
10977 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face2Face M,W,F 11:30AM - 12:20PM Not Online
ENG3014.0002: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Grajeda)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and junior standing

"Theories of Literature" is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential "schools of thought" or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, reader response, and eco-criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. we will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to read texts from a variety of different critical perspectives and perform research at an appropriately advanced undergraduate level.
19190 ENG4114 Literature and Film Face2Face M,W 1:30PM - 2:45PM Not Online
ENG4114.0001: Literature and Film
(Grajeda)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENG 3014

The practice of adapting literary works to the silver screen has been in place since the beginning of motion pictures. Indeed, early filmmakers often turned to classic literature as a way of not only appealing to audiences but also seeking to legitimize the fledgling art form. As the tradition of adaptation has evolved over the past century, however, cinema has developed a much more complex relation to literature, at times exceeding the limits of the page with an audio-visual spectacle barely resembling its literary source. This course will explore adaptation as a concept and theoretical practice, challenging the conventional treatment of adaptation that often privileges literature over film. Instead, we will study how each medium tells a story in different ways, considering, as narratologist Seymour Chatman once put it, "what novels can do that films can't (and vice versa)." By examining a range of films both classic and current, in conjunction with the literary works that function as their source material, this version of ENG4114 will open up the idea of adaptation as a form of interpretation, moving beyond the relation between film and literature to include the cinematic adaptation of historical events, graphic novels, animation, and video games.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81210 ENG3073 Cultural Studies Literature Face2Face Tu,Th 3:00PM - 4:15PM Not Online
ENG3073.0001: Cultural Studies Literature
(Grajeda)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

What do shopping malls, hip hop, Disney, video games, zombie movies, fan fiction, mash-ups, and YouTube have in common? They have all come under the scrutiny of what is called "cultural studies." As a relatively new academic field, cultural studies addresses the increasing importance of "culture" (in the widest sense of the term) to post-industrial consumer societies over the past few decades. This course will begin by tracing some of the historical debates on the emergence of commercial mass culture since the late 19th Century--as necessary background to our work--before considering several theoretical approaches to the study of culture, including the Frankfurt School, British cultural studies, contemporary feminist theory, and American cultural populism. Following these sessions on cultural theory, the course will proceed to the application of cultural studies by taking up its interdisciplinary method of interpreting and "reading" culture, turning to specific examples of analyzing the texts and practices of popular culture: advertising, television, movies, pop music, and other forms of "entertainment." Our work will consist of weekly readings, several short response papers as well as a final term paper, and lively discussion of the culture of everyday life.
90823 LIT3605 Literature and War Face2Face Tu,Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM Not Online
LIT3605.0001: Literature and War
(Grajeda)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This course will explore the complex relation between literature and war in the 20th Century by pursuing a set of questions for which there are no easy answers. To what extent has literature been responsible for mythologizing war and thus reproducing the very desire that makes militarism alluring? Is literature capable of conveying what war is like through a conventional aesthetic of realism or are other literary modes better equipped to represent such brutal reality? Is there a limit to the capacity of literature to document the horrors of war, horrors that are otherwise unspeakable? Is literature tasked by society with an obligation to act as the conscience of a nation, a form of ethical reflection on the causes and consequences of war? While the course will mostly focus on more traditional forms of literature (poetry, fiction, memoir), we will also make use of recent developments in literary theory that have expanded the notion of a "text," allowing us to include a wider range of cultural forms (graphic novel, documentary and fiction film, online sources).
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50761 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web A Web Not Online
ENG3014.AW59: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Grajeda)

PR: Junior standing and grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

“Theories of Literature” is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential “schools of thought” or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, reader response, and ecocriticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. We will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to read texts from a variety of different critical perspectives and perform research at an appropriately advanced undergraduate level.

Updated: Jul 10, 2015

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu