1. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  2. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  3. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  4. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  5. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  6. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  7. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  8. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  9. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  10. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  11. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  12. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  13. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  14. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  15. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  16. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  17. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  18. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  19. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  20. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  21. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  22. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  23. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  24. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  25. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  26. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  27. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  28. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  29. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  30. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  31. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard

Anthony Grajeda, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Modern Studies, Department of English from The University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee (2001)

Selected Publications

Books

  • Music, Sound, and Technology in America: A Documentary History of Early Phonograph, Cinema, and Radio. Co-Edited by Timothy D. Taylor and Mark Katz. Duke University Press, 2012
  • Jay Beck and Tony Grajeda, editors, Lowering the Boom: Critical Studies in Film Sound (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008) and in translation: Chinese (Beijing: China Film Press, 2013)

Articles/Essays

  • “The ‘Sweet Spot’: The Technology of Stereo and the Field of Auditorship,” in eds., Paul Théberge, Kyle Devine, and Tom Everett, Living Stereo: Histories and Cultures of Multichannel Sound (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015), 37-63.

  • “Post-War Postponed: War without End, the Returning Soldier in American Cinema, and the Gendered Representation of Trauma,” Special Issue on “Media, Technology and the Culture of Militarism,” eds., Robin Andersen and Tanner Mirrlees, Democratic Communiqué (Vol. 26, No. 2, Fall 2014), 55-71.

  • “Early Mood Music: Edison’s Phonography, American Modernity and the Instrumentalization of Listening,” in Marta García Quiñones, Anahid Kassabian and Elena Boschi, eds., Ubiquitous Musics: The Everyday Sounds That We Don’t Always Notice (Farnham, U.K.: Ashgate, 2013), 31-47.

  •  “’A Question of the Ear’: Listening to Touch of Evil,” in Jay Beck and Tony Grajeda, eds., Lowering the Boom: Critical Studies in Film Sound (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008), 201-217.

  • “The Winning and Losing of Hearts and Minds: Vietnam, Iraq, and the Claims of the War Documentary,” Jump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media 49 (Spring 2007), 38 ms. pages; 41 web pages: http://www.ejumpcut.org/archive/jc49.2007/Grajeda/index.html.

  • “Picturing Torture: Gulf Wars Past and Present,” in Andrew Martin and Patrice Petro, eds., Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the “War on Terror” (New Brunswick, NJ and London: Rutgers University Press, 2006), 206-235.
  • “Disasterologies,” Social Epistemology: A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy, special issue on “After Social Construction: Technology, Knowledge, and Society” 19:4 (October-December  2005), 315-319.

  • "The Sound of Disaffection," in Henry Jenkins, Tara McPherson, and Jane Shattuc, eds., Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002), 357-375.

  • "The 'Feminization' of Rock," in Roger Beebe, Denise Fulbrook and Ben Saunders, eds., Rock Over the Edge: Transformations of Popular Music Culture (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002), 233-254.

Book Sections/Chapters

  • “Introduction: Cinema,” in Timothy D. Taylor, Mark Katz and Tony Grajeda, editors, Music, Sound, and Technology in America: A Documentary History of Early Phonograph, Cinema, and Radio (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2012), 137-44, 378-82.

  • Jay Beck and Tony Grajeda, “Introduction: The Future of Film Sound Studies,” in Beck and Grajeda, eds., Lowering the Boom: Critical Studies in Film Sound (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008), 1-20.

Miscellaneous Publications

  • Journals (Guest Editor)  

    Music, Sound, and the Moving Image 2:2 (Autumn 2008 [published 2009]), Special Issue on “The Future of Sound Studies,” co-edited with Jay Beck, with co-authored introduction, 109-114.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10898 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W,F 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM Not Online

“Theories of Literature” is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential “schools of thought” or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststucturalism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, reader response, and eco-criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. We will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to read texts from a variety of different critical perspectives and perform research at an appropriately advanced undergraduate level.

19280 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W,F 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM Not Online

“Theories of Literature” is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential “schools of thought” or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststucturalism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, reader response, and eco-criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. We will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to read texts from a variety of different critical perspectives and perform research at an appropriately advanced undergraduate level.

19282 ENG4614 Discourse Global Cultrl Studie Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W 03:00 PM - 04:15 PM Not Online

It has been said that the texts of American popular culture—in particular, pop cultural styles, aesthetics and practices —have become something of a global lingua franca, in which everyone the world over "speaks" Miley, McDonald's, and Mickey. But the discourse of western cultural imperialism is nothing new: the emergence of the cinema at the turn of the last century, for example, played a part in the colonialist enterprise, even as film culture gave rise to a utopian fantasy of the cinema as "visual Esperanto" — a new universal language based on images. This course will explore the latest stage of "globalization" by taking a cultural studies approach indebted to literary and cultural theory, one which examines not only the so-called Disneyfication of the world, but also those particular attempts to assimilate that culture into vernacular contexts. In other words, how and where have people both accepted and altered the textual "meaning" of Mickey? The course will introduce students to some key concepts and theoretical approaches to global cultural studies before focusing primarily on three cultural forms (cinema, television, popular music). We will analyze a range of texts from popular culture by attending to questions of transmission, translation and appropriation. To what extent does Hong Kong cinema turn Hollywood Chinese? Is "world music" a form of exoticism? How do kids in Mexico City "read" MTV?

No courses found for Fall 2018.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50642 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study World Wide Web (W) A Not Online

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102                                           

“Theories of Literature” is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential “schools of thought” or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststucturalism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, and reader response criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. We will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10745 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W,F 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM Not Online

ENG 3014.0001: Theories and Techniques of Literature Study (Grajeda)

Spring 2018

“Theories of Literature” is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential “schools of thought” or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststucturalism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, reader response, and eco-criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. We will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to read texts from a variety of different critical perspectives and perform research at an appropriately advanced undergraduate level.



10942 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W,F 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM Not Online

ENG 3014.0002: Theories and Techniques of Literature Study (Grajeda)

Spring 2018

“Theories of Literature” is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of contemporary approaches to the academic study of literary and cultural texts. The course will cover many of the most prominent and influential “schools of thought” or critical theories of literature, including New Criticism, structuralism, poststucturalism/deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, sexuality/queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial and critical race theory, reader response, and eco-criticism. We will study explanatory texts about the various theories, along with representative texts of theory itself. We will also apply these approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from canonical works to popular forms (such as film). We will engage with the scholarly debate in literary studies and work toward the construction of an advanced analytical paper in preparation for 4000-level coursework. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to read texts from a variety of different critical perspectives and perform research at an appropriately advanced undergraduate level.

11592 LIT6936 Studies in Lct Theory Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) W 06:00 PM - 07:15 PM Not Online

By the end of the 20th Century, a number of academic disciplines across the humanities and social sciences had taken the cultural “turn” toward what is now called cultural studies, an interdisciplinary approach to the increasing importance of culture to “post-industrial” consumer societies. And while English departments and literary studies have adopted cultural studies as a generalized theoretical paradigm, encompassing everything from reader-response and new historicism to neo-marxian and post-colonial theory, a more specific lineage can be traced back to the formation of British cultural studies and the Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (BCCC). This course will examine a selection of texts produced by the “culturalist” tradition associated with the BCCC, exploring as well some of its continuing influences in contemporary debates over mass culture and popular culture, ideology and communication, modernism and postmodernism, and the often fraught nexus of intellectual work and politics.

No courses found for Fall 2017.

Updated: Sep 19, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu