1. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  2. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  3. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  4. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  5. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  6. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  7. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  8. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  9. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  10. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  11. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  12. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  13. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  14. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  15. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  16. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  17. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  18. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  19. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  20. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  21. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  22. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  23. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  24. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  25. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  26. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  27. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  28. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  29. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  30. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  31. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
Patricia B. Angley

Patricia B. Angley, Ph.D.

  • Associate Lecturer
  • Advisor of Undergraduate Programs
  • pangley@ucf.edu
  • 407-823-5596
  • Office Hours: M 10:00-11:00am; T 12:30-2:00pm & by appt
  • Campus Location: CNH405A

Education

  • Ph.D. in English from University of Hawai'i at Manoa (1998)
  • M.A. in English from Northern Michigan University
  • B.A. in English from Florida State University

Research Interests

  • Twentieth & Twenty-first Century American Literature
  • Women Writers and Feminist Theory
  • Contemporary Native American Literature
  • Faulkner and Southern Literature

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • Angley, Patricia and Adenike Davidson. “Reading, Writing, and Theorizing theOther: Pedagogies of Disruption in Composition.” Collaborating(,) Literature(,) and Composition: An Anthology for Teachers and Writers of English. Eds. Frank Gaughan and Peter H. Knost. Cresskill, NY:Hampton Press, 2007. 45-69. Print.
  • Angley, Patricia. "Fleur Pillager: Feminine Mythic, and Natural Representations in Louise Erdrich's Tracks." Literary Studies East and West 12 (1996): 159-69. (Excerpted in Short Stories for Students" Presenting Analysis, Context, and Criticism on Commonly Studied Short Stories. Vol. 22. Ed. Ira Mark Milne. New York: Thomson Gale, 2006. 91-6.) Print.
  • Angley, Patricia. “Lois-Ann Yamanaka.” Dictionary of Literary Biography. Vol. 312. Asian American Writers. Ed. Deborah L. Madsen. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. 332-37. Print.
  • Angley, Patricia. “Constructing the Subject: Linda Snopes Kohl’s Speech in Faulkner'sThe Town and The Mansion." Florida English 1 (2003): 17-43. Print.
  • Angley, Patricia. "Expert Voices: The construction of Knowledge in the Writing Classroom." Florida English Journal 37 (2001): 39-42. Print.
  • Angley, Patricia, et. al. "Ways of Reading: Frank O'Connor's 'Lady Brenda' and the Possibilities of Criticism." Frank O'Connor: New Perspectives. Eds. Robert C. Evans and Richard Harp. Locust Hill Literary Studies. No 23. West Cornwall, CT: Locust Hill, 1998. 239-61. Print.

Book Reviews

  • Angley, Patricia. Rev. of Faulkner’s Imperialism: Space, Place, and the Materiality of Myth, by Taylor Hagood. The Florida Historical Quarterly 89.4 (2011): 540-2. Print.

Awards

2015 University Faculty Advising Excellence Award

2014 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award

2012 CAH Undergraduate Teaching Excellence Award

2011 University Faculty Advising Excellence Award

2009 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award

2007 CAH Undergraduate Teaching Excellence Award

2007 University Faculty Advising Excellence Award

2004 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19372 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Rdce Time M,W 11:30AM - 12:20PM Not Online

AML 3041.0M02: American Literature II (Angley)

Spring 2018

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This course surveys American literature(s) from 1865 to the present, a time when literary texts and traditions in the United States increased in kind and in number. We have many texts to choose from, and any choices exclude other choices. However, we will read a variety of texts in an attempt to become acquainted with the represented voices, voices that reflect the social, cultural, and ideological influences of their place in history. Some of the voices we will listen to have been anthologized widely, but others have only recently been included in the "canon" of American literature, a "canon" that continues to evolve. While we will play close attention to literary movements and genres as well as particular times and places in our history, we will look also at how gender, race, class, religion, culture and politics have influenced the formation of the texts we read. An understanding of context is necessary to our understanding and interpretation of literary expression during the turbulent times of increasing urbanization, great wars, economics, social, and political struggle and conflict, technological advances, and the alienation and fragmentation of our "modern" and "postmodern" world.

10965 AML4300 Major American Authors Face2Face Tu,Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM Not Online

AML 4300.0001  Major American Authors: Morrison  (Angley)

Spring 2018

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENG 3014.

This course will focus on 1993 Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison’s novels from The Bluest Eye (1970) through God Help the Child (2015), her short story “Recitatif,” and selected nonfiction as well as critical scholarly essays that discuss Toni Morrison and her oeuvre. Her texts will be situated in their historical, cultural, literary, and political contexts, and students will examine the transformative power of Morrison’s contributions to contemporary American literature. Morrison’s writing demands that students become actively involved in her project “to avert the critical gaze from the racial object to the racial subject; from the described and imagined to the describers and imaginers; from the serving to the served.”

21590 ENG3010 Practical Criticism Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21591 ENG4114 Literature and Film Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21593 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21592 LIT3933 Literature and Law Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
91259 AML3283 Cont American Women's Fiction Rdce Time M,W 11:30AM - 12:20PM Not Online
AML3283.0M01: Contemporary American Women’s Fiction
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102.

This course includes American fiction written by women between 1970 and the present. The novels and short story collections confront issues of class, race, gender, age, sexuality, ethnicity, and culture and examine how these issues define women’s identities. The representations of women in these texts are complex—often rejecting systems of oppression that surround them.
91261 AML3615 Harlem, Haiti, and Havana Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
93537 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
93540 CRW3211 Creative Nonfiction Writing Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
81822 LIT3192 Caribbean Literature Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
81824 LIT3605 Literature and War Face2Face Tu,Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM Not Online
LIT 3605.0001 Literature & War
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102.

Throughout human history, war and other forms of militarized conflict have been pervasive both within nations and states and across the globe. This situation continues today. In this course, you will read and write about literary texts (novels, short stories, poetry, memoir, or film) that represent multiple perspectives and experiences intersecting war in the 20th and 21st centuries.
93541 LIT4034 Contemporary Poetry in English Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50946 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Web A Web Not Online
LIT3932.AW61: Topics in Popular Fiction
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102.

The literature of the American West dates back to the beginnings of this country. In this course, however, students will read novels that were published from the late 1940s to the present. These novels, many of which were made into films, reflect the conflict between men and the challenging landscape they inhabit. By giving readers a glimpse into the American West through the eyes of the rugged individualists, the Western captured the American imagination. In addition to reading, discussing, and writing about texts, students can expect to learn about the literary, cultural, and historical contexts surrounding them.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
21330 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
19160 AML3643 Cont Native Amer Prose & Poetr Rdce Time M,W 11:30AM - 12:20PM Not Online
AML3643.0M01: Contemporary Native American Prose & Poetry
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

In this course, you will be reading nonfiction, novels, poetry, and short stories by and about contemporary Native American (American Indian) authors. We will also read a screenplay and view a film, both of which were written by Native American authors. The presence of Native American literature as a part of English department offerings has increased during the last 40 years as have other ethnic literature, but not without an uphill struggle. Nevertheless, the Native American texts that we read in this course are an integral part of our American literary and cultural heritage as they continue an ongoing revision of the dominant culture's view of what it means to be Indian, "mixed blood" or ethnic in the United States. As Susan Perez Castillo claims in "Postmodernism, Native American Literature and the Real: The Silko-Erdrich Controvery," "Surely it is more productive in the evaluation of so-called 'ethnic' texts, to view ethnicity not as a static entity but rather as a dynamic, historically constructed process." Negative images of Native Americans have been burned into our national consciousness. This course will challenge those images.
11003 AML4300 Major American Authors Face2Face Tu,Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM Not Online
AML4300.0001: Major American Authors: Erdrich
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENG 3014

The work of prolific and acclaimed contemporary Native American author Louise Erdrich (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa) is the focus of this course. Students will read selected novels which depict the challenges the Chippewa (Ojibwe) and Anglos encountered during the settling of the northern plains and the consequences of this westward expansion that still affect Native Americans in the twenty-first century. Erdrich's novels are rich with complex and contradictory characters and situations. The voices that fill these novels resonate with readers as they contest the stereotypes of Native Americans. Erdrich's contribution to contemporary American literatures is significant.
21331 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21328 ENL2022 English Literature Ⅱ Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21327 ENL3296 Gothic Literature Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21332 ENL4240 English Romantic Writers Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21326 LIT4043 Modern Drama As Literature Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
21329 LIT4233 Postcolonial Theory & Lit Face2Face - Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81835 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Rdce Time M,W 11:30AM - 12:20PM Not Online
AML3041.0M01: American Literature II
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This course surveys American literature(s) from 1865 to the present, a time when literary texts and traditions in the United States increased in kind and in number. We have many texts to choose from, and any choices exclude other choices. However, we will read a variety of texts in an attempt to become acquainted with the represented voices, voices that reflect the social, cultural, and ideological influences of their place in history. Some of the voices we will listen to have been anthologized widely, but others have only recently been included in the "canon" of American literature, a "canon" that continues to evolve. While we will play close attention to literary movements and genres as well as particular times and places in our history, we will look also at how gender, race, class, religion, culture and politics have influenced the formation of the texts we read. An understanding of context is necessary to our understanding and interpretation of literary expression during the turbulent times of increasing urbanization, great wars, economics, social, and political struggle and conflict, technological advances, and the alienation and fragmentation of our "modern" and "postmodern" world.
90825 LIT4303 Post-world War Ⅱ Fiction Face2Face Tu,Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM Not Online
LIT4303.0001: Post-World War II Fiction
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better in ENG 3014

Writers, texts and theorists that full under the "movement" often called postmodernism question belief systems that claim universality for transcendence; thus, it shouldn't be surprising that postmodern fiction defies easy definition. For our purposes, however, we will think of this fiction as the fiction that is written after World War II. The texts that we will read are ones that investigate various representations of the paradox that is the second half of the Twentieth Century - the realization that the reason and science that contributed to human "progress" brought with it mass destructive capabilities never before seen in the human experience. This paradox is present also in the textual representations that we will read. Just as material and existential realities changed following World War II so did the way readers and writers view genre and narrative. Thus, we will examine how and why postmodern fiction with its ironies, fissures, gaps, ruptures, and discontinuities disrupts traditional genre and narrative strategies beyond the boundaries of what is usually, but not always, considered modernist fiction.

We will read novels and short fiction by authors such as Heller, Kesey, El Saadawi, Pynchon, Achebe, Reed, Vonnegut, Mason, Roy, Mailer, Delillo, Potok, Anzaldua, and/or Morrison. Students can expect a midterm, a final exam, one research project which includes an annotated works consulted, a proposal and a 10-page paper, informal and formal presentations, reading quizzes and participation in class discussions.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50987 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Web A Web Not Online
LIT3932.AW61: Topics in Popular Fiction
(Angley)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

The literature of the American West dates back to the beginnings of this country. In this course, however, students will read novels that were published from the late 1940s to the present. These novels, many of which were made into films, reflect the conflict between men and the challenging landscape they inhabit. By giving readers a glimpse into the American West through the eyes of the rugged individualists, the Western captured the American imagination. In addition to reading, discussing, and writing about texts, students can expect to learn about the literary, cultural, and historical contexts surrounding them.

Updated: Dec 11, 2017

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu