1. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  2. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  3. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  4. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  5. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  6. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  7. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  8. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  9. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  10. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  11. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  12. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  13. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  14. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  15. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  16. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  17. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  18. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  19. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  20. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  21. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  22. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  23. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  24. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  25. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  26. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  27. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  28. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  29. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  30. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  31. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
Fayeza Hasanat

Fayeza Hasanat, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. from University of Florida (2005)

Research Interests

Literature of the British Empire; English Novel, Gender Studies;  Translation Studies; Postcolonial Theory;  South Asian Diaspora 

Selected Publications

Books

  • Nawab Faizunnesa’s RupJalal (Translation and Commentary). Leiden : E. J. Brill Publishers, 2009

Articles/Essays

  • Forthcoming  “Muslim Women Writers in Colonial Bengal.” Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures. Online Edition. Ed. Suad Joseph. www.brill.nl/ewio. Forthcoming.
  •   “In the Light of What We Know about the Good Muslims of Brick Lane and beyond: Religion, Diaspora and the Politics of a Homing Desire in the writings of Zia Haider Rahman, Tahmima Anam and Monica Ali. South Asian Diaspora, Special Issue.  Eds. Mandal and Jain. Asiatic, June 2017. http:// www.asiatic.iium.edu
  •  "Sultana’s Utopian Awakening: An Ecocritical Reading of Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain’s Sultana’s Dream.” A Feminist Foremother: Critical Essays on Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain. Eds.Quayum and Hasan. New Delhi: Orient Black Swan, 2016. 
  •  “Three Kinds of History, Three Women’s Texts, and the Futility of Diasporic Desire in Bharati Mukherjee’s Desirable Daughters and The Tree Bride. Bharati Mukherjee: Critical Perspectives. Ed. Somdatta Mandal. New Delhi: Pencraft  International. 2010.
  • “Recasting Muslim Women,” in South Asian Review, 28: 2 (June 2007), 76-97.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10666 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study World Wide Web (W) Not Online

   An introduction to Literary Theory in the 20th and 21st centuries including New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Marxist, New Historicism and Postcolonial Theory. We will read Charlotte Bronte’s canonical novel Jane Eyre and consider this versatile text through the lenses of the various theories we’ll study.

   This class is entirely online. Students should be prepared to read a rigorous textbook on their own and to take responsibility for their own learning. This class is best suited for students who are self-motivated, disciplined, and organized. Narrated power point videos will deliver brief summaries of the theories and weekly online discussions will apply them to the novel. Assignments include reading quizzes; discussions; research essay; midterm, peer-editing; final exam.

20628 ENL3296 Gothic Literature World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” or better required in ENC 1102. A study of Gothic literature (prose, poetry, drama) in the British Isles and its cultural contexts.

19293 LIT4233 Postcolonial Theory & Lit Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 01:30 PM - 02:45 PM Not Online

This course will focus on issues of postcoloniality, nature of colonial discourse, connection between national culture and imperial power, the symbolic and symbiotic relationship between the colonizer and the colonized, and the relevance of postcoloniality to the issues of race, gender, sexuality, and class. As an introduction to Postcolonial studies, this course will examine foundational literary texts and major postcolonial theorists.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81552 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study World Wide Web (W) Not Online

An introduction to Literary Theory in the 20th and 21st centuries including New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Marxist, New Historicism and Postcolonial Theory. We will read Charlotte Bronte’s canonical novel Jane Eyre and consider this versatile text through the lenses of the various theories we’ll study.

This class is entirely online. Students should be prepared to read a rigorous textbook on their own and to take responsibility for their own learning. This class is best suited for students who are self-motivated, disciplined, and organized. Narrated power point videos will deliver brief summaries of the theories and weekly online discussions will apply them to the novel. Assignments include reading quizzes; discussions; research essay; midterm, peer-editing; final exam.

91283 ENL3654 Black British Literature World Wide Web (W) Not Online

 The element of ‘blackness’ posed a tint of challenge to the British political and cultural hegemony. It provokes the issue of decentering  structural supremacy of the sign ‘British’ that played a key role in the making of Empire or breaking apart nations. Resulting from the slave trade, Britain always had a black presence in the margin of its history for the last four hundred years; however, after the Second World War, a massive number of immigrants from all its former colonies made blackness a complicated rupture in the solid foundation of Britishness. “Black British” has been used by some critics in reference to South Asian, African, and Caribbean British writings alongside each other ; on the other hand, there are critics who use the term to refer to Britain’s African-Caribbean and African origin.

We will map out the trajectory of black presence in British Literature using the lenses of history, politics, and culture. Like Robinson Crusoe, we will follow the footprints and trace back the black presence in the island of British history and observe Britain’s painful process of naming/ renaming of the black presence, and the blackness’s literary and political struggle to make its presence noted in the imagined literary community of British Literature. 

91289 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61624 LIT3482 Literature & Popular Culture World Wide Web (W) A Not Online

   The aim of this course is to encourage you to hear and converse with the many voices that speak of our culture. Because cultural conversations are cross disciplinary in their very core, it is only logical that this course will bring all those different voices and aspects together. This course will therefore explore the transdisciplinary areas of cultural studies in relation to various genres of literary and popular media. In its attempt to connect the issues of texts and/in cultural contexts, this course will use identity as a prime motif and invite students to bring popular texts, movies, TV shows, and novels under critical scrutiny. Throughout the semester, you are expected to perform the role of a critic and scrutinize/analyze various elements of socio-politico-cultural ideology contributing to the formation of individual identity.

Updated: Dec 6, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu