1. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  2. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  3. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  4. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  5. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  6. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  7. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  8. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  9. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  10. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  11. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  12. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  13. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  14. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  15. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  16. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  17. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  18. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  19. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  20. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  21. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  22. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  23. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  24. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  25. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  26. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  27. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  28. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  29. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  30. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  31. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
Kathleen Hohenleitner

Kathleen Hohenleitner, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in British and Irish Literature from University of Notre Dame (1998)

Research Interests

British Literature, Irish Literature, Literary Theory, Modern Drama

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11613 ENG3821 What's Next for English Majors Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM Not Online

   English Majors, you have skills! This class aims to help English majors explore options for employment after graduation. This class will familiarize students with strategies to help them succeed on campus and beyond.

   The class meets once a week and has an M component with weekly online assignments. Guest speakers from various campus offices such as Career Services, graduate Faculty, and UCF alums from various English-related careers will prepare students for success. Attendance is an important part of the grade, because of the many guest speakers.

   Students will complete rhetorical analyses of job ads, research into the impact of the Humanities on the job market, practice an “elevator speech”; and create an online portfolio of writing that will be tailored to each student’s individual post graduation plans. Portfolios may include Statements of Purpose, cover letters, resumes or more creative portfolios.

11625 ENL4303 British Authors World Wide Web (W) Not Online

We will read the major works of Jane Austen and consider what they reveal about her society and her evolving narrative style. We will consider such topics as language, class, irony, narration, colonialism and film adaptation.

This fully online class will include weekly reading quizzes, online video lectures, participatory discussions (minimum of 2 posts per week), midterm, final, research essay.

20088 LIT3212 Research & Writing About Lit World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better in ENC 1102 or C.I. Research, writing, and critical analysis skills applicable to upper-level literature courses.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81023 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study World Wide Web (W) Not Online

An introduction to Literary Theory in the 20th and 21st centuries including New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Marxist, New Historicism and Postcolonial Theory. We will read Charlotte Bronte’s canonical novel Jane Eyre and consider this versatile text through the lenses of the various theories we’ll study.

This class is entirely online. Students should be prepared to read a rigorous textbook on their own and to take responsibility for their own learning. This class is best suited for students who are self-motivated, disciplined, and organized. Narrated power point videos will deliver brief summaries of the theories and weekly online discussions will apply them to the novel. Assignments include reading quizzes; discussions; research essay; midterm, peer-editing; final exam.

81803 ENG3821 What's Next for English Majors Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) Tu 09:00 AM - 10:15 AM Not Online

English Majors, you have skills! This class aims to help English majors explore options for employment after graduation. This class will familiarize students with strategies to help them succeed on campus and beyond.

The class meets once a week and has an M component with weekly online assignments. Guest speakers from various campus offices such as Career Services, graduate Faculty, and UCF alums from various English-related careers will prepare students for success. Attendance is an important part of the grade, because of the many guest speakers.

Students will complete rhetorical analyses of job ads, research into the impact of the Humanities on the job market, practice an “elevator speech”; and create an online portfolio of writing that will be tailored to each student’s individual post graduation plans. Portfolios may include Statements of Purpose, cover letters, resumes or more creative portfolios.

91720 LIT3212 Research & Writing About Lit World Wide Web (W) Not Online

Course Description: This fully online class focuses on the research process. The class aims to introduce students to literary research, reading and evaluating articles and other literary sources, incorporating cited material, formatting the essay according to MLA style. We will read primary and secondary sources, as well as practice using Library Databases and Open Education Sources.  Students will practice disseminating their work with peers and be encouraged to explore publishing opportunities, contests, research showcases, and other opportunities to share their research.

Text: Reading and Writing about Literature: A Portable Guide. 4th edition. Editors, Janet Gardner and Joanne Diaz. NY: Bedford, St. Martin’s. 2017.

We will read familiar American short stories, poems and a play from the textbook from which we will draw our writing topics.

Assignments include readings, discussion posts, quizzes, research essay and drafts, annotated bibliography, peer reviews, final exam.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61623 LIT4043 Modern Drama As Literature World Wide Web (W) B Not Online

In this short summer class we will read Western drama from the 20th and 21st centuries. Texts will include Susan Glaspell, Bert Brecht, Samuel Beckett, David Mamet, David Henry Hwang, August Wilson, Tony Kushner, and Caryl Churchill, among others. Students will write a short research essay and write a performance review of a play or film adaptation of a play.

Textbook: Norton Anthology of Drama, vol. 2, 3rd edition.

Assignments: Online discussion, quizzes, midterm, research essay, final exam

Updated: Dec 6, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu