1. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  2. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  3. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  4. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  5. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  6. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  7. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  8. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  9. The Night We Set the Dead Kid on Fire by Ephraim
  10. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  11. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  12. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  13. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  14. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  15. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  16. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  17. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  18. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  19. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  20. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  21. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  22. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  23. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  24. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  25. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  26. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  27. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  28. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  29. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  30. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
Kathleen Hohenleitner

Kathleen Hohenleitner, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in British and Irish Literature from University of Notre Dame (1998)

Research Interests

British Literature, Irish Literature, Literary Theory, Modern Drama

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11588 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
11589 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
20429 ENG3821 What's Next for English Majors Rdce Time M,W 10:30AM - 11:20AM Not Online
No Description Available
19417 LIN4801 Language and Meaning Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81818 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
92537 ENG3821 What's Next for English Majors Rdce Time Tu 9:00AM - 10:15AM Not Online
No Description Available
81820 ENL4303 British Authors Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61729 LIN4801 Language and Meaning Web B Web Not Online
LIN 4801.BW61: Language and Meaning
(Hohenleitner)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This class is a linguistic study of the nature of language, meaning, and the ways in which humanity uses language in various social, cultural, institutional, and professional settings. We will consider how metaphor, figurative language, and abstract terms shape our thought. As a linguistics class, we will not focus on literature, but on language usage. We will be concerned not with rhetoric as much as how specific signifiers evolve over time and the cultural implications they acquire.
We will also consider the aural side of language use, such as the current discussion of “upspeak” and vocal fry. We will study examples of these vocal trends and the cultural stereotypes associated with them.
We will read selections from linguist Geoffrey Nunberg’s Ascent of the A-word, Tim William Machon’s What is English and Why Should We Care?, and other essays on language usage. We will also listen to podcasts of analysis of language usage.
Assignments include one research essay, midterm, final, online discussions.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10710 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web Web Not Online
ENG3014.0W61: Theories and Techniques of Literary Study
(Hasanat)

PR: Junior standing and grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This course explores various theories of literature from Aristotle to Wittig. We will read primary texts of theories and comprehensive analysis of various theories. In the process of being familiar with various critical ideas, we will read literary texts and try to theorize the texts and/or contextualize theories.
10711 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web Web Not Online
ENG 3014.0W62: Theories & Techniques of Literary Study

(Hohenleitner)
Course Description: An introduction to Literary Theory in the 20th and 21st centuries including New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Marxist, New Historicism and Postcolonial Theory. We will read Charlotte Bronte’s canonical novel Jane Eyre and consider this versatile text through the lenses of the various theories we’ll study.
This class is entirely online. Students should be prepared to read a rigorous textbook on their own and to take responsibility for their own learning. Because this is fully online, this class is best suited for students who are self-motivated, disciplined, and organized. Narrated power points will deliver brief summaries of the theories and weekly online discussions will apply them to the novel. Assignments include reading quizzes; discussions; research essay; peer-editing; final exam.
20072 ENG3930 Special Topics Rdce Time M,W 10:30AM - 11:20AM Not Online
ENG 3930.0M01: "What's Next for English Majors?"

Reading Lindsey Pollak's Getting from College to Career English majors will complete modules that offer them an awareness of career options open to them, including the work force, professional school, and other writing opportunities. The class is aimed at early juniors, but is open to any English major seeking to steer their undergraduate coursework toward professionalization upon graduation. Students will hear from guest speakers, successful alumni, UCF faculty on such topics as "Your Internet Presence," "Writing a Professional Resume," and "Writing Professional School Application Essays." In an effort to develop self-advocacy attitudes, a discourse of terminology that exemplifies their skills, students will assemble a professionalization portfolio (résumé, writing samples, cover letters, etc.) and practice delivering an “elevator speech” as part of their modules.
10859 LIT2120 World Literature Ⅱ Web Web Not Online
LIT2120.0W61: World Literature II
(Hohenleitner)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This class will cover literature written in various languages and translated into English. We will read texts from a variety of genres and cultures form the 17th century until the present. We will read a diverse sampling of classical drama, magical realism, Japanese hokku tradition, postmodern fiction, from among the world literary traditions. This class fulfills the Cultural and Historical foundations of the GEP curriculum. Assignments include weekly online discussion, weekly quizzes, and 2 short essays.
19197 LIT4184 Irish Literature Rdce Time M,W 12:30PM - 1:20PM Not Online
LIT4184.0M01: Irish Literature
(Hohenleitner)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

Students will gain a cultural and historical perspective on Irish writing outside the context of the traditional English canon by reading Irish-born writers and by considering the implications of power, gender, language and identity in postcolonial writing. Students will improve analytical writing and research skills by writing a series of theses-driven research assignments.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
90817 ENL4303 British Authors Web Web Not Online
ENL4303.0W61: British Authors - Jane Austen
(Oliver)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENG 3014

During the semester, we will read all of Jane Austen's major works--and a few of her minor ones--and explore the cultural, literary, socio-political, and historical influences on Jane Austen's novels, as well as the current and continued fascination with her texts. We will be paying particular attention to Austen's style, the duality of her texts, and what her texts say--or do not say--about the culture in which they were written. Colonialism, sibling relations, nostalgia, gender, and film--all these aspects of Austen's novels will also be explored.
81887 LIN4801 Language and Meaning Rdce Time Tu 9:00AM - 10:15AM Not Online
LIN4801.0M01: Language and Meaning
(Hohenleitner)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better requires in ENC 1102 and sophomore standing

This class is a linguistic study of the nature of language, meaning, and the ways in which humanity uses language in various social, cultural, institutional, and professional settings. We will consider metaphor and how the words we use to articulate figurative language construct the ways in which we understand abstract terms. As a linguistics class, we will not focus on literature, but on language usage. We will be concerned not with rhetoric as much as how specific signifiers evolve over time and the cultural implications they acquire.

We will also consider the aural side of language use, such as the current discussion of "upspeak" and vocal fry. We will study examples of these vocal trends and the cultural stereotypes associated with them.

We will read linguist Geoffrey Nunberg's "Ascent of the A-word", George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's "Metaphors We Live By, and a number of essays on language usage. In the mediated component of the class, we will read shorter essays and listen to podcasts of analysis of language usage.

Assignments include one research essay, midterm, final, online discussions, and other shorter writings.
80169 LIT2120 World Literature Ⅱ Web Web Not Online
LIT2120.0W61: World Literature II
(Hohenleitner)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This class will cover literature written in various languages and translated into English. We will read texts from a variety of genres and cultures form the 17th century until the present. We will read a diverse sampling of classical drama, magical realism, Japanese hokku tradition, postmodern fiction, from among the world literary traditions. This class fulfills the Cultural and Historical foundations of the GEP curriculum. Assignments include weekly online discussions, weekly quizzes, and 2 short essays.
92072 LIT2120 World Literature Ⅱ Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50759 ENL2022 English Literature Ⅱ Web B Web Not Online
ENL2022.BW61: English Literature II
(Hohenleitner)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This fully online class will cover literature written in England between 1798 and 1914. We will read poetry, drama and fiction by a diverse selection of writers. We will take a historical approach to everything we read. Assignments include listening to brief audio lecture, online discussion, quizzes, midterm, final exam, and one research essay.

Updated: Feb 23, 2017

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu