1. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  2. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  3. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  4. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  5. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  6. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  7. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  8. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  9. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  10. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  11. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  12. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  13. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  14. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  15. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  16. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  17. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  18. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  19. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  20. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  21. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  22. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  23. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  24. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  25. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  26. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  27. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  28. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  29. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  30. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  31. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
Dan Jones

Dan Jones, Ph.D.

  • Professor
  • Dan.Jones@ucf.edu
  • 407-823-5596
  • Office Hours: Virtual Office Hrs: Monday through Friday: 11:00-Noon
  • Campus Location: CNH303B

Dan Jones teaches a variety of undergraduate and graduate technical communication courses. This spring (2018) he completes his 35th year at UCF after previously teaching technical communication courses for 4 years at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach and after teaching writing courses for 5 years as a graduate teaching assistant at Florida State University. 

His books include Technical Writing Style (Allyn and Bacon, 1998), The Technical Communicator's Handbook (Allyn and Bacon, 2000), and Technical Communication: Strategies for College and the Workplace (Longman, 2002), co-authored with Karen Lane. He is also a Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication. After a long career of teaching, research, and service, he will retire in May of 2018.

Education

  • Ph.D. in English from Florida State University (1979)

Research Interests

Technical communication, plain English and plain language, science and literature, writing and designing online help, and science fiction

Awards

Academic and Professional Honors

 National Professional Awards.

  • 2003. Ronald S. Blicq Award for Distinction in Technical Communication Education “To recognize distinguished contributions to technical communication education.” A technical communication award presented by the IEEE International Professional Communication Society.
  • 2000. Elected a Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication. Recognized "For creativity in the development of academic technical communication programs, for contributions to electronic communication among students and professionals, and for the dissemination of new ideas in technical communication style." According to the Society, "Becoming an STC Fellow is a lifelong journey of achievement, an honor bestowed by the Society upon Associate Fellows who have continued to make exemplary contributions to our organization and profession, who have made good on their promise to make a difference."
  • 1998. Jay R. Gould Award for Excellence in Teaching Technical Communication. An award given to a select few annually by the Society for Technical Communication in honor of Professor Gould who taught for many years in the discipline.
  • 1998. Elected an Associate Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication. Recognized “For dedication to the advancement of technical communication, particularly through publishing, teaching, and program development.”
  • 1986. Best Article Award. Recognized for writing the best article of the year for The Technical Writing Teacher (Fall 1985, Volume 12, No.2) by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW). First time award presented by ATTW.  Award now called the Nell Ann Pickett Award for Best Article of the Year.

 University of Central Florida Awards.

  • 2009. TIP Award recipient under the 2008-2009 Teaching Incentive Program (TIP) of the State University System of Florida.
  •  2004. TIP Award recipient under the 2003-2004 Teaching Incentive Program (TIP). 
  •  2001. College of Arts and Sciences Professional Service Award for service both to the university and to the profession of technical communication. 
  • 1999. Excellence Award for Undergraduate Teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
  • 1997. TIP Award recipient under the 1996-97 Teaching Incentive Program (TIP).
  • 1995. Excellence Award for Undergraduate Teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
  • 1994. TIP Award recipient under the 1993-94 Teaching Incentive Program (TIP).

Local Awards from the Orlando Central Florida Chapter of STC.

  • 2009. The Gloria Jaffe Outstanding Technical Communicator Award—Lifetime Achievement.
  • 2007. Orlando Chapter STC Award “For sustained exemplary service to Orlando Chapter STC as Listserv Administrator for ten years.”
  • 2006. Distinguished Chapter Service Award given by the Society for Technical Communication for outstanding service to the Orlando Chapter. For “Serving as an inspiration and role model to generations of students and supporting their entry into the profession of technical communication, and for sustained contributions to the Orlando Chapter.” 

Courses

No courses found for Spring 2019.

No courses found for Fall 2018.

No courses found for Summer 2018.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10115 ENC4280 Technical Writing Style Web Web Not Online

ENC 4280.0W61: Technical Writing Style (Jones)

Spring 2018

Description:

This course provides a better understanding of prose style and covers specific strategies for improving writing style, particularly for writing correspondence (e-mail, letters, and memos), reports, proposals, instructions (for example, tutorials, manuals, and reference), and policies and procedures as well as for writing various online genres—websites, blogs, e-zines, online help and more.

Objectives include learning:

·         How style and technical writing style may be defined

·         What the relationships are between style and rhetoric

·         How prose styles depend on the rhetorical situation and are influenced by different discourse communities

·         How prose styles range from plain styles to complex styles to unnecessarily complex styles and how to choose what is most appropriate

·         How the persuasive nature of technical writing influences technical prose style

·         What general diction problems technical writers share with all other writers

·         What challenges are presented by specialized language and how to deal with these challenges

·         How to write more effective technical sentences, paragraphs and larger segments

·         How to establish a wide range of tones, including humor, in writing

·         How bias is defined and how it influences writing style

·         What some of major style issues are concerning gender and ethics

·         How to edit for problems in prose style

·         What resources are available either in print or on the Internet for improving prose, including a variety of style guides or style manual

Requirements include weekly discussion posts and quizzes on the reading, a style critique (in memo form) of weaknesses in style of selected documents, and a research paper on a prose style topic.

19403 ENC6296 Online Help Systems Web Web Not Online

ENC 6296 Writing and Designing Online Help (www)

Description:

This course is an introduction to designing and creating different kinds of online help files or help systems for the computer industry. In addition to learning some of the specialized language of the software industry, students will study the major kinds of software documents and online Help systems: software tutorials, procedures, and reference guides. One major focus will be on writing and designing an online tutorial from a task-oriented point of view. 

Objectives include:

  1. Learning how to apply general principles for writing and designing effectively for the online environment.
  2. Learning more about the computer software industry and its specialized language.
  3. Learning more about current trends concerning online Help and tools for creating it.
  4. Learning about online software tutorials, procedures, and reference guides.
  5. Learning how to write and design a tutorial from a task-oriented point of view.
  6. Learning how to create more effective online documents by following minimalist writing principles: knowing your audience, removing nonessential content, and focusing on user goals instead of product functions.
  7. Creating a brief tutorial to include in your professional portfolio.

Requirements include weekly discussion posts and quizzes on the reading, a critique of a professional tutorial, a proposal for a tutorial, a tutorial, and an accompanying memo discussing how the tutorial reflects the many principles covered during the semester.



Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
80644 ENC4218 Visual in Tech Documentation Web Web Not Online
ENC 4218. 0W61: The Visual in Technical Communication
(Jones)

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 4293

This course focuses on three major areas to help you improve your design skills specifically for technical communication: design principles and theories, design processes, and design practices.

The overall goals of the course are to:

• Study the basic principles and theories of effective print and online design
• Learn about the design processes involving pages, type, graphics, color, lists, tables, and forms
• Explore a variety of design practices for many projects
• Explore how designs should be edited, reviewed, evaluated, and tested
• Learn how to apply a wide variety of design elements to an original design project
• Explore how documents are produced

Requirements include weekly discussions and quizzes on the reading, a critique of a professional design project, and a major design project.
81888 ENC4219 Tech Comm & Plain Language Web Web Not Online
ENC 4219.0W61: Technical Communication and Plain Language
(Jones)

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 3241

This course focuses on how many of the strategies used for effective plain language are often the same strategies used for effective technical communication. Although plain language is not the best strategy for every communication challenge, it can be the best approach for many challenges. Numerous case studies demonstrate how audiences benefit from plain language in many technical, legal, financial, and government documents. Learning the strategies for writing clearly in plain language can also benefit those who must often write in a more complex style.

In this course, you will learn about:

• Efforts to define or to describe plain language
• The history of the plain style and plain language
• The elements and benefits of plain language
• Efforts to require plain language in government
• Strategies for achieving plain language in technical documents
• Plain language and legal language
• Cases dealing with plain language
• Writing low-literacy plain language
• The basics of using plain language for page layout and for text in visuals
• Efforts to professionalize plain language through setting standards, training, and certification

Requirements include weekly discussions and quizzes on the reading, an analysis of plain language, and a research paper.
81431 ENC4265 Writing for Computer Industry Web Web Not Online
ENC 4265.0W61: Writing for the Computer Industry
(Jones)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This course is an introduction to designing and creating different kinds of online help files or help systems for the computer industry. In addition to learning some of the specialized language of the software industry, students will study the major kinds of software documents and online Help systems: software tutorials, procedures, and reference guides. One major focus will be on writing and designing an online tutorial from a task-oriented point of view.

Objectives for the course include:

1. Learning how to apply general principles for writing and designing effectively for the online environment.
2. Learning more about the computer software industry and its specialized language.
3. Learning more about current trends concerning online Help and tools for creating it.
4. Learning about online software tutorials, procedures, and reference guides.
5. Learning how to write and design a tutorial from a task-oriented point of view.
6. Learning how to create more effective online documents by following minimalist writing principles: knowing your audience, removing nonessential content, and focusing on user goals instead of product functions.
7. Creating a brief tutorial to include in your professional portfolio.

Assignments include weekly discussions and quizzes on the reading, a tutorial critique, and a brief tutorial accompanied by a memo discussing strategies for creating the tutorial.
Writing for the Computer Industry—
This course is an introduction to designing and creating different kinds of online help files or help systems for the computer industry. In addition to learning some of the specialized language of the software industry, students will study the major kinds of software documents and online Help systems: software tutorials, procedures, and reference guides. One major focus will be on writing and designing an online tutorial from a task-oriented point of view.

Objectives for the course include:

8. Learning how to apply general principles for writing and designing effectively for the online environment.
9. Learning more about the computer software industry and its specialized language.
10. Learning more about current trends concerning online Help and tools for creating it.
11. Learning about online software tutorials, procedures, and reference guides.
12. Learning how to write and design a tutorial from a task-oriented point of view.
13. Learning how to create more effective online documents by following minimalist writing principles: knowing your audience, removing nonessential content, and focusing on user goals instead of product functions.
14. Creating a brief tutorial to include in your professional portfolio.

Assignments include weekly discussions and quizzes on the reading, a tutorial critique, and a brief tutorial accompanied by a memo discussing strategies for creating the tutorial.

Updated: Dec 1, 2017

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu