1. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  2. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  3. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  4. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  5. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  6. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  7. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  8. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  9. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  10. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  11. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  12. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  13. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  14. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  15. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  16. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  17. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  18. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  19. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  20. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  21. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  22. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  23. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  24. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  25. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  26. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  27. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  28. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  29. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  30. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  31. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés

Education: 

M.F.A. Creative Writing, University of Central Florida

B.A. English, University of Central Florida

Minor, Cultural Anthropology, University of Central Florida

A.A. Nursing, Anne Arundel College

A.A. Art History, South Suburban State College

Judith Roney’s fiction, essays, and poetry have appeared in numerous publications. Waiting for Rain won an honorable mention for Two Sylvias Press 2016 chapbook contest. Her poetry collection, According to the Gospel of Haunted Women, received the 2015 Pioneer Prize. She teaches in all genres of creative writing at the University of Central Florida, with a concentration in poetry, and is a staff poetry reader for The Florida Review

Research Interests

Re-telling of literature for “twisted structure,” historical and current culturally-fueled dystopian fiction, literary horror rooted in truth, memoir re-interpreted as-surrealism/fabulism, interior-paranoia narratives of the unreliable narrator, historical domestic abuse texts, the literary ghost story, the work of Shirley Jackson in correlation to Edward Hopper’s shadow studies, poetry of the marginalized and the dead, history of witchcraft in the British Isles, domestic space poetry & prose, and myth-making for the unexplained.

Recent Research Activities

Major Publications:
According to the Gospel of Haunted Women

Awards

Winner, October 2018 Creative Juicing Contest, Sinkhole Magazine, “Man-Child”

Semi-Finalist, 2018 Two Sylvias Chapbook Prize, Judge Danez Smith, Bless the Wayward Boy,

Nomination, 2018 The Orison Anthology, “News From the Dead at Dozier School for Boys”

Finalist & Honorable Mention, 2016 Two Sylvias Chapbook Contest, Judge January Gill O’ Neil, Waiting for Rain

Nominee2016 Florida Book Award Nominee, According to the Gospel of Haunted Women,

Finalist, 2015 Gambling the Aisle Chapbook Contest, Field Guide for a Human

Winner,2015 Pioneer Prize for a poetry collection,According to the Gospel of Haunted Women

Winner, Prism ReviewPrize 2015, “War” and “Where Addiction Begins”

Nomination, 2015 Pushcart Prize, “My Nickname Was Frankenstein.” Nonbinary Review, Editor Lise Quintana, Zoetic Press

Nomination, 2015 Spring AWP Intro Journal Award

Nomination, 2014 Spring AWP Intro Journal Award

Nomination, 2012 Spring AWP Intro Journal Award

Outstanding Poet, 2012, University of Central Florida

President’s Honor Roll, University of Central Florida, 2010-2012

Certificate of Recognition, “Outstanding Achievement” in SOC 121, Section 0001, Anthropology, Anne Arundel Community College, 2009

Psychology Outstanding Student, 2007 Edison State College

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
20777 CRW3013 Creative Writing for English M World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor and grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102, or C.I. Literary genres; practice and critique of peer writing; critical reading of established authors.

This is an introductory course to general writing techniques for the four genres of poetry, fiction, the creative nonfiction essay, and scriptwriting.

The student will learn and incorporate terms of the discipline of creative writing in order to create pieces of writing and respond to published work in the four genres, for it is only by practice and reading that an emerging writer gains strength in their craft.

11566 CRW3310 Poetry Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor, junior standing, and a grade of C (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and CRW 3053, or C.I. Group analysis and criticism; close reading of contemporary poetry and poetic theory.

Writing and reading poetry improves writing in all genres.

This is an intermediate level poetry workshop that aspires to banish “fear” of writing poetry many students express. Focus is on work poems are capable of through mastering use of extraordinary language to find vivid expressions capable of revealing emotions and events of the human experience in fresh and unique word choices. In addition, we work together to identify and break weak writing habits, creative direct and indirect metaphors as replacements for adjective strings, and practice the art of brevity.

Students are encouraged to experience poems as art more so than literature. We use prompts to facilitate the creative process, and implement craft elements most often present in “good” poems. We read and discuss work of contemporary poets to study what poets do to write good poems.

Assignments include: Write original poems, participate in the workshop process, write and share responses to weekly poetry readings, create a Submittable account (free), submit works of poetry to journals, keep a poetry journal, and revise work for a final portfolio as the final exam.

In addition we will experiment with spoken word, erasure, collage, and “found” poetry. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
93138 CRW3053 Thry & Practice Creative Wrtng World Wide Web (W) Not Online

Theory & Practice of Creative Writing: PR: English major or minor and a grade of "C" (2.0) or better in ENC 1102, or C.I. 

Web-based course; WWW access, browser, e-mail required.

Examination of the various genres in contemporary literary creative writing, including graphic novels, horror, hybrid work, sci-fi and fantasy, with attention to literary technique and discussion of theory in the writing community. Students are required to read published work (with an emphasis on faculty publications) as prompts for practice of writing in all genres examined, as well as write short essays on writing theory, to which they will be asked to respond through a variety of methods. Students will also submit original, creative work to journals so that they gain practice in the “art of submission."

In this theory & practice class, we will work through four main objectives:

  • Work to prepare the student for success as a creative writing student in the University of Central Florida's Creative Writing BA degree program. 
  • Help students segue into a "reading like a writer" approach, versus "reading like a literature major," as you study the complexities and techniques of creative writing for your future workshop classes.
  • Get students writing, i.e. practice, practice, practice. Please note: this is not a creative writing workshop class, but you will submit creative writing assignments based on prompts, with word limits, and receive feedback from peers as well as brief feedback from your instructor. 
  • Examine what is generally necessary to be a successful, professional writer. Some skills are as simple as following word counts and using correct punctuation. We will discuss in depth many of the craft techniques and practices used by authors. 
81589 CRW3310 Poetry Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor, junior standing, and a grade of C (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and CRW 3053, or C.I. Group analysis and criticism; close reading of contemporary poetry and poetic theory.

Writing and reading poetry improves writing in all genres.

This is an intermediate level poetry workshop that aspires to banish “fear” of writing poetry many students express. Focus is on work poems are capable of through mastering use of extraordinary language to find vivid expressions capable of revealing emotions and events of the human experience in fresh and unique word choices. In addition, we work together to identify and break weak writing habits, creative direct and indirect metaphors as replacements for adjective strings, and practice the art of brevity.

Students are encouraged to experience poems as art more so than literature. We use prompts to facilitate the creative process, and implement craft elements most often present in “good” poems. We read and discuss work of contemporary poets to study what poets do to write good poems.

Assignments include: Write original poems, participate in the workshop process, write and share responses to weekly poetry readings, create a Submittable account (free), submit works of poetry to journals, keep a poetry journal, and revise work for a final portfolio as the final exam.

In addition we will experiment with spoken word, erasure, collage, and “found” poetry. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50802 CRW3310 Poetry Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) A Not Online

PR: English major or minor, and grade of C (2.0) or better required in CRW 3310 

   Taking this class will improve the student’s writing in all genres: Fiction, Creative nonfiction, graphic narrative, scriptwriting, and, of course, poetry. Students will learn the importance of word choice, what to reveal, what to withhold, and the value of trimming superfluous language. 

   This is an intermediate level poetry workshop that aspires to first banish the “fear” of poetry many students express, then to focus on the “work” a poem does, through the unusual language of poetry, its attempt to convey the “unsayable,” and to express emotions and events of the human experience through hard-working imagery. We will learn to break weak writing habits, and use proper formatting.

   In this class students are encouraged to experience poems more as an objects of art rather than literature. Students will be given specific prompts to facilitate the creative process, and implement craft elements most often present in “good” poems. We will read and discuss the work of contemporary poets to learn how to write good poetry. Assignments include writing original poems,  participation in learning the workshop process, writing responses to assigned weekly poetry readings, create a submission account (free), submit works of poetry to journals, and revise work for a final portfolio.

Updated: Dec 19, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu