1. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  2. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  3. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  4. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  5. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  6. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  7. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  8. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  9. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  10. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  11. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  12. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  13. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  14. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  15. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  16. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  17. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  18. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  19. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  20. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  21. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  22. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  23. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  24. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  25. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  26. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  27. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  28. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  29. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  30. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  31. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
Darlin' Neal

Darlin' Neal, Ph.D.

Darlin' Neal is the author of the story collections, Rattlesnakes & The Moon (Press 53, 2010) and Elegant Punk (Press 53, 2012). She is the 2011 Taos Summer Writers Conference DH Lawrence Fellow. Her work has been nominated numerous times for the Pushcart Prize and has appeared in The Southern Review, Shenandoah, Puerto del Sol and dozens of other magazines, as well as in anthologies such as Best of The Web 2009, and Southern Poetry Anthology: Volume II, Mississippi (Texas Review Press).

Education

  • Ph.D. in Creative Writing/20th Century British and American Literature from University of Southern Mississippi
  • M.F.A. in Creative Writing/Fiction from University of Arizona
  • M.A. in English/Creative Writing from New Mexico State University

Research Interests

  • Literary Fiction
  • Literary Nonfiction
  • Memoir
  • Poetry and Flash Fiction
  • Native American Literature
  • Writing of the Southwest
  • Southern Writers
  • Eudora Welty

Recent Research Activities

Books:

Elegant Punk, a short story collection, (Spring 2012, Press 53)

Rattlesnakes and The Moon, a short story collection, (Spring 2010, Press 53)

Dozens of short stories, nonfiction pieces and poetry in nationally and internationally circulated journals, including THE SOUTHERN REVIEW, PUERTO DEL SOL, SHENANDOAH, MISSISSIPPI REVIEW, and THE BEST OF THE WEB.

Awards

  • UCF College of Arts and Humanities Research Grant 2012
  • DH Lawrence Fellow, 2011 Taos Summer Writers Conference
  • Mississippi Arts Commission Literary Arts Fellowship United Arts of Central Florida Fellowship recipient, 2010
  • Henfield Foundation Transatlantic Review Award
  • Joan Johnson Award for Fiction, University of Southern Mississippi
  • New Mexico State University's Frank Waters Fiction Fellowship

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
18258 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

This is a beginning level fiction writing workshop.  One half of the course will be spent reading fiction and defining specific components of craft. The second half of the course will be a workshop where we explore and discuss your own fiction writing. During the first half of the course, you will read published literary fiction and work on your own craft exercises aimed at helping you hone your understanding of craft and generate story material. In the second half of the course we will workshop your own literary fiction which will be rendered through either close third person point of view or 1st person narrative point of view. Attendance and participation are factored into your grade.  Missing more than two online discussions puts you in jeopardy of failing the class. 

18450 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

This is a beginning level fiction writing workshop.  One half of the course will be spent reading fiction and defining specific components of craft. The second half of the course will be a workshop where we explore and discuss your own fiction writing. During the first half of the course, you will read published literary fiction and work on your own craft exercises aimed at helping you hone your understanding of craft and generate story material. In the second half of the course we will workshop your own literary fiction which will be rendered through either close third person point of view or 1st person narrative point of view. Attendance and participation are factored into your grade.  Missing more than two online discussions puts you in jeopardy of failing the class. 

18004 CRW4122 Adv Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

This is an advanced course for dedicated and determined writers of literary fiction.  By now you should have the basic working terminology for discussing craft under your belt. Character, point of view, plot, setting, chronology, thematic development, image, and meaning should all be concepts that you have a basic working understanding of and are attempting to utilize/develop inside your own fiction. We will workshop a minimum of two short stories by each writer in the class. The two required workshop stories will be written in either close third person or first person point of view.  This class is geared toward the understanding and discussion of literary fiction...This is NOT a class that will examine or generate: science fiction, romance writing, any form or genre writing including UFO, vampire or talking cockatiel stories. This is not to discourage your imagination or dispel your enthusiasm for breaking rules and forging new literary horizons -- but this course is geared toward understanding the craft of fiction, literary fiction.  I can't teach or give you talent or vision, but I can and will impart what I know about craft.  Attendance and participation are factored into your grade.  Missing more than two online discussions puts you in jeopardy of failing the class. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
90551 CRW4122 Adv Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

This is an advanced course for dedicated and determined writers of literary fiction.  By now you should have the basic working terminology for discussing craft under your belt. Character, point of view, plot, setting, chronology, thematic development, image, and meaning should all be concepts that you have a basic working understanding of and are attempting to utilize/develop inside your own fiction. We will workshop a minimum of two short stories by each writer in the class. The two required workshop stories will be written in either close third person or first person point of view.  This class is geared toward the understanding and discussion of literary fiction...This is NOT a class that will examine or generate: science fiction, romance writing, any form or genre writing including UFO, vampire or talking cockatiel stories. This is not to discourage your imagination or dispel your enthusiasm for breaking rules and forging new literary horizons -- but this course is geared toward understanding the craft of fiction, literary fiction.  I can't teach or give you talent or vision, but I can and will impart what I know about craft.  Attendance and participation are factored into your grade.  Missing more than two online discussions puts you in jeopardy of failing the class. 

93169 LIT6097 Studies in Cont Fiction Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) W 06:00 PM - 07:15 PM Not Online

After spending a year studying Jungian Analysis at the New Orleans Jungian Institute, I started thinking about the similarities of stories and dreams. I revisited, and am still revisiting, my conception of mythology. I came to wonder more how the abstraction of an archetype, much like that of a symbol, works most powerfully when discovered and then recognized by both the writer and literary analyst, meaning along the way of writing or contemplating what we have read. As writers and readers shouldn’t we mindfully question the role of spirit and mythology and dream in literary fiction? How is a short story a sort of mirror of a dream? Or, for instance, whom is the helper in a story or novel actually helping: his own agenda/himself or the reader? When do we, as readers and writers, tap into the collective unconscious? The helper’s power drive belongs in the shadow lands of our soul - all of which is part of the “field” while writing… and is mostly unconscious. How might it then be a call for increasing consciousness when a work of literary fiction makes its way into our lives, into the world. While reading a diverse group of Contemporary American fiction, we will examine such Jungian concepts as The Shadow, Archetype, Fairytale, and Psyche.

Drawing on Carl Jung’s works we will discuss our never-ending struggle for increased consciousness as we enter fictional realms. We will touch upon how the same stories make their way into the consciousness of every culture in new ways. Studying the ways stories and novels teach us about the role of the unconscious, or studying the collective unconscious itself, cannot be completed in a lifetime, much less a semester, but here we will begin making connections. This class will be reading intensive. Among the books on our reading list are Tommy Orange’s THERE THERE and GRIMM’S FAIRYTAILS. We will also be revisiting essays on fiction by Joy Williams and Flannery O’Connor (from MYSTERY and MANNERS).

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
60945 CRW3211 Creative Nonfiction Writing World Wide Web (W) A Not Online

All of our work this semester will be done on-line, and since this is a six-week semester, we have a lot to cram into a brief amount of time.  But we’ll be focusing on writing relatively short assignments, so the workload shouldn’t prove to be overwhelming.In fact, let’s hope that the work turns out to be a lot of fun.  I’m a firm believer in the joy of creation.At this point, you have practiced the techniques and familiarized yourself with the terms taught in your introductory creative writing courses, and you're now ready to specialize in nonfiction writing, fine‑tune your skills, and push the limits of your imagination. We'll spend the semester reading, writing, and discussing the moves nonfiction writers use to tell dramatically satisfying and thematically significant stories.  We’ll start the semester with a flurry of short exercises to isolate and practice certain techniques as well as serve as inspiration for your completed stories.  Our primary goal is to aim toward the discovery of craft.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10664 CRW3211 Creative Nonfiction Writing World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor and grade of C (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and CRW 3053, or C.I. Writers present original nonfiction writing for class response and individual conferences. Reading of key works of creative nonfiction with discussion of definitions of the genre.

11249 CRW4122 Adv Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor, and grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in CRW 3120, or C.I. Intensive writing practice in fiction. Peer critique and group discussion of original manuscripts.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
91261 AML3643 Cont Native Amer Prose & Poetr Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Not Online
No Description Available
81376 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor, junior standing, and grade of C (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and CRW 3053, or C.I. An intermediate level fiction writing workshop for English majors; group analysis and criticism; close reading of contemporary fiction and fiction theory.

81546 CRW4122 Adv Fiction Writing Workshop Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) Th 01:30 PM - 02:45 PM Not Online

PR: English major or minor, and grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in CRW 3120, or C.I. Intensive writing practice in fiction. Peer critique and group discussion of original manuscripts.

Updated: Dec 6, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu