1. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  2. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  3. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  4. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  5. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  6. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  7. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  8. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  9. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  10. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  11. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  12. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  13. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  14. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  15. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  16. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  17. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  18. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  19. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  20. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  21. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  22. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  23. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  24. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  25. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  26. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  27. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  28. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  29. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  30. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  31. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
Bill Fogarty

Bill Fogarty, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in English from University of Oregon
  • M.F.A. in Poetry from Brooklyn College, City University of New York
  • M.Phil. in Irish Literature from Trinity College, Dublin
  • B.A. in English from State University of New York at New Paltz

Research Interests

Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Poetics in America, Britain, and Ireland; Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Literature; Modernism

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • “Wallace Stevens in America Thinks of Himself as Thomas MacGreevy.” The Wallace Stevens Journal. 35.1 (Spring 2011): 79-97. Print.

Awards

National Endowment for the Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship in Poetics, Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Emory University (2017-18)

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
18592 AML3273 Beat Lit & Mid-century Writers World Wide Web (W) Not Online

Mid-Century American society was prosperous for some but also severely constrained by institutionalized racial segregation, McCarthyism and the red scare, and rampant sexism and sexual repression. Young American writers often positioned their work squarely against those restraints. What we now call the Beat Generation in many ways epitomized such literary repudiation. This course will examine the radical poetry and prose of seminal Beat writers such as Burroughs, Corso, Ginsberg, Kerouac, and Snyder as well as lesser-known works by women beat writers (di Prima, Jones, Waldman). We will also read key works of writers who inspired the Beats (Blake, Whitman, Williams) and follow lines to the contemporaneous literary endeavors of confessionalism, feminism, Black Arts poetry, and the New York School. We will end with Adrienne Rich’s Diving into the Wreck and Ginsberg’s The Fall of America, both winners of the 1974 National Book Award, as a capstone for the mid-century period. Throughout, we will pay attention to the legacy of the Beats and their mid-century contemporaries, locating influences in present-day culture.

19614 LIT6276 Teaching College Literature Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W 06:00 PM - 07:15 PM Not Online

LIT 6276 Teaching College Literature

What are we doing when we undertake the pedagogical challenge of teaching literature in college? This class will study a variety of responses to that question, both theoretical examinations and practical approaches. At the same time, we will work on developing and articulating our own pedagogical methodologies and philosophies. Students will observe a literature class, discuss their own classroom experiences as students, teaching assistants, and/or instructors, and present a teaching demonstration on a particular literary text, differentiating introductory and advanced levels and surveys from more specialized seminars. Students will finally produce a teaching portfolio consisting of syllabi, assignments, and activities for a literature course and a teaching philosophy that addresses issues such as diversity and inclusivity, canonical vs. nontraditional texts, and teaching difficult and controversial material. We will also practice cogent responses for interview questions about teaching, and we will share our portfolios to build a library of pedagogical resources.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
90854 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 01:30 PM - 02:45 PM Not Online

In his 1916 poem “A Pact,” Ezra Pound stages a reconciliation between himself and Walt Whitman, his so-called “pig-headed father” whom he has “detested long enough”: Pound declares, “let there be commerce between us.” This survey of American literature from 1865 to the present examines such “commerce” between the modes of writing that have come to define the modern American literary tradition. We will examine the ways Mark Twain and Henry James expanded upon the literary realism defined during Victorianism and American Romanticism, and how writers such as Charles Chesnutt, Zitkala Sa, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman took those expansions further. We will then turn our attention to the experiments of modernism and postmodernism, considering how, for instance, Moore, Williams, Hurston, McKay, Brooks, and Rich challenged our very understanding of what we might call “American realities” while insisting on the plurality of that phrase. Finally, we will read a selection of contemporary poems and short fiction to inquire into the ways that writers today continue to make and re-make American literature.

92922 AML3076 Topics in American Literature World Wide Web (W) Not Online

AML 3079 Topics in American Literature: Twentieth-Century American Poetry

Helen Vendler has remarked, “Twentieth-century American poetry has been one of the glories of modern literature.” Indeed, the 1900s produced in America the great poems of Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Langston Hughes, Robert Hayden, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Allen Ginsberg, Adrienne Rich, Sharon Olds, Lucille Clifton, and Joy Harjo. These poets offer something of an emotional and aesthetic history of a tumultuous, catastrophic century that redefined the country and the world, a century punctuated by two World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, feminism, queer liberation, globalization, and the digital revolution. We will identify the connections between the great modernist innovations of the earlier part of the century and the postmodern innovations of formalism, confessionalism, Black Arts poetry, the Beat Generation, the New York school, and the Black Mountain poets during the post-WWII period–the start of what’s often called “the American Century.” We will consider our time period as the “long twentieth century,” grounding ourselves at the beginning of the semester in the proto-modern poems of Whitman, Dickinson, and Dunbar and ending in our present moment with the post-2000 work of Tracy K. Smith, Terrance Hayes, and Danez Smith.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61122 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ World Wide Web (W) B Not Online

In his 1916 poem “A Pact,” Ezra Pound stages a reconciliation between himself and Walt Whitman, his so-called “pig-headed father” whom he has “detested long enough”: Pound declares, “let there be commerce between us.” This survey of American literature from 1865 to the present examines such “commerce” between the modes of writing that have come to define the modern American literary tradition. We will examine the ways Mark Twain and Henry James expanded upon the literary realism defined during Victorianism and American Romanticism, and how writers such as Charles Chesnutt, Zitkala Sa, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman took those expansions further. We will then turn our attention to the experiments of modernism and postmodernism, considering how, for instance, Moore, Williams, Hurston, McKay, Brooks, and Rich challenged our very understanding of what we might call “American realities” while insisting on the plurality of that phrase. Finally, we will read a selection of contemporary poems and short fiction to inquire into the ways that writers today continue to make and re-make American literature.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11396 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W,F 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM Not Online

In his 1916 poem “A Pact,” seminal modernist Ezra Pound stages a reconciliation between himself and Walt Whitman, his so-called “pig-headed father” whom he has “detested long enough”: Pound declares, “let there be commerce between us.” This survey of American literature from 1865 to the present examines such “commerce” between the modes of writing that have come to define the modern American literary tradition. We will examine the ways Mark Twain and Henry James expanded upon the literary realism defined during Victorianism and American Romanticism, and how writers such as Charles Chesnutt, Frank Norris, Zitkala Sa, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman took those expansions further. We will then turn our attention to the experiments of modernism and postmodernism, considering how, for instance, Moore, Williams, Faulkner, Hurston, McKay, Brooks, Hayden, Miller, Baraka, and Rich challenged our very understanding of what we might call “American realities” while insisting on the plurality of that phrase. Finally, we will read a selection of contemporary poems (Harjo, Lee, Sharif) and short fiction (Lahiri, Díaz) to inquire into the ways that writers today continue to make and re-make American literature.

20029 AML3273 Beat Lit & Mid-century Writers World Wide Web (W) Not Online

Mid-Century American society was prosperous for some but also severely constrained by institutionalized racial segregation, McCarthyism and the red scare, and rampant sexism and sexual repression. Young American writers often positioned their work squarely against those restraints. What we now call the Beat Generation in many ways epitomized such literary repudiation. This course will examine the radical poetry and prose of seminal Beat writers such as Burroughs, Corso, Ferlinghetti, Ginsberg, Kerouac, and Snyder as well as lesser-known works by women beat writers (di Prima, Jones, Waldman). We will also read key works of writers who inspired the Beats (Blake, Whitman, Williams, Duncan, Rexroth) and follow lines to the contemporaneous literary endeavors of confessionalism, Black Arts poetry, and the New York School. Throughout, we will pay attention to the legacy of the Beats and their mid-century contemporaries, locating influences in present-day culture.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
91259 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 04:30 PM - 05:45 PM Not Online

In his 1916 poem “A Pact,” seminal modernist Ezra Pound stages a reconciliation between himself and Walt Whitman, his so-called “pig-headed father” whom he has “detested long enough”: Pound declares, “let there be commerce between us.” This survey of American literature from 1865 to the present examines such “commerce” between the modes of writing that have come to define the modern American literary tradition. We will examine the ways Mark Twain and Henry James expanded upon the literary realism defined during Victorianism and American Romanticism, and how writers such as Charles Chesnutt, Frank Norris, Zitkala Sa, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman took those expansions further. We will then turn our attention to the experiments of modernism and postmodernism, considering how, for instance, Moore, Williams, Faulkner, Hurston, McKay, Brooks, Hayden, Miller, Baraka, and Rich challenged our very understanding of what we might call “American realities” while insisting on the plurality of that phrase. Finally, we will read a selection of contemporary poems (Harjo, Lee, Sharif) and short fiction (Lahiri, Díaz) to inquire into the ways that writers today continue to make and re-make American literature.

91260 AML3041 American Literature Ⅱ Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 12:00 PM - 01:15 PM Not Online

In his 1916 poem “A Pact,” seminal modernist Ezra Pound stages a reconciliation between himself and Walt Whitman, his so-called “pig-headed father” whom he has “detested long enough”: Pound declares, “let there be commerce between us.” This survey of American literature from 1865 to the present examines such “commerce” between the modes of writing that have come to define the modern American literary tradition. We will examine the ways Mark Twain and Henry James expanded upon the literary realism defined during Victorianism and American Romanticism, and how writers such as Charles Chesnutt, Frank Norris, Zitkala Sa, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman took those expansions further. We will then turn our attention to the experiments of modernism and postmodernism, considering how, for instance, Moore, Williams, Faulkner, Hurston, McKay, Brooks, Hayden, Miller, Baraka, and Rich challenged our very understanding of what we might call “American realities” while insisting on the plurality of that phrase. Finally, we will read a selection of contemporary poems (Harjo, Lee, Sharif) and short fiction (Lahiri, Díaz) to inquire into the ways that writers today continue to make and re-make American literature.

Updated: Oct 8, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu