1. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  2. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  3. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  4. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  5. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  6. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  7. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  8. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  9. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  10. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  11. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  12. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  13. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  14. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  15. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  16. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  17. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  18. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  19. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  20. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  21. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  22. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  23. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  24. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  25. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  26. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  27. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  28. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  29. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  30. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  31. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
Christian Beck

Christian Beck, Ph.D.

Christian Beck received his Ph.D. in Medieval English Literature and Cultural Studies from Binghamton University (SUNY). Christian teaches courses on British Literature, Literature of Place and Space, and Literature and Law.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Medieval English Literature and Cutlural Theory from Binghamton University (SUNY) (2010)

Research Interests

  • The history of emotions
  • Spatial theory
  • Anarchist literature and thought
  • Political Movements and activism
  • Chaucer

Recent Research Activities

Christian is currently working on a book project: Spatial Resistance: Literary and Digital Challenges to Neoliberalism

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • “Web of Resistance: Deleuzian Digital Space and Hacktivism.” Deleuze: Spaces of Change and Challenge in Journal for Cultural Research 20.
  • “Shaping Our (Medieval) Future Through Nomadic Insurgency: A Radical Reading of Ywain and Gawain.” Medievalia 36/37: A Special Issue on Medieval Futures

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10708 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Rdce Time M,W 1:30PM - 2:20PM Not Online

   Theories of Literature will introduce you to ways of accessing texts that will open them up to more varied and challenging readings. Although the critical and theoretical approaches we will study are often complex and daunting, by the end of the semester you will be able to recognize and apply the approaches to a variety of literary and cultural texts. The theoretical background and writing skills you acquire should increase your understanding of literature, authorship, and literary analysis. Questioning the assumptions behind our ways of reading and meaning making is an activity we engage in often, and as a result, we will have dynamic class discussions that leave nothing uncontested. We will work hard not to stereotype or marginalize critical or theoretical approaches that seem "strange" or "old-fashioned" to us.

11124 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online

   This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.

10667 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online

   Renegades, rebels, rogues, tricksters, and the like will be the focus of this survey of early world literature. We will examine the evolution of this complicated character at various times, spaces, and places, from the Greeks to the Mayans to Shakespeare. We will investigate how these figures work within and against the prevailing ideas of their day, and what their tricks, cons, and/or challenges mean in their varied cultural contexts. Sometimes, our discussion will focus on individual characters, sometimes it may focus on authors, and sometimes the trickster element will be more implicit than explicit.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81451 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online

   This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.

91285 LIT3206 Place and Space in Literature Rdce Time M,W 10:30AM - 11:20AM Not Online

   This course is designed to identify and analyze various uses of space and place in both literature and society. Places and spaces, as we will see, are complex matrices of ideologies, interpellation, geography, architecture, and social planning. A single space can be the intersection of various, if not conflicting, ideas; a space that is both constructed by human subjects and constructs human subjects. Think, for example, of a classroom and how it is constructed, as well as how, in turn, the classroom constructs/determines your behavior/expectations (this will be a perennial example). For the first part of the course, we will be reading and discussing theories of place and space from a variety of perspectives (i.e., Geographically, Marxist, Gender Studies, Anarchist, etc.). At which point we will turn to literature. There are three main goals to this course: 1) To identify and critically analyze the way space is utilized in literature; 2) To identify and critically analyze the way places and spaces are constructed in our society; 3) To think critically about the places and spaces of education (all levels) and how a different structure might produce improved results within critical thinking/education. To meet the goals of the last two goals, we will be taking regular “outings” and hold class in different settings. These different settings and your experience of them while discussing literature will be the topic of your discussion posts.

81257 LIT3933 Literature and Law Rdce Time M,W 1:30PM - 2:20PM Not Online

   This course will focus on the figure of the Vigilante and his/her relationship to the law. We will discuss the nature and reason for this figure and the environment/circumstances in which the Vigilante arises. During a time of social unrest, vigilante action becomes increasing more common and this course will look to literature that celebrates/demonizes extra-judicial action as a way to better understand some of the current issues in our own society. Through the figure of the Vigilante, we can highlight the fractures within the social contract, the nation-state, the legal system, and the judicial system. This course uses a range of cultural theory to provide a working foundation for class discussion and analysis of literature. We will be reading a range of texts from various time periods and genres as a means to draw a clear picture of who the Vigilante is, why this figure is necessary, and his/her relationship not only to the law, but to government more generally.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50647 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ Web A Web Not Online

   This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.

No courses found for Spring 2018.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81639 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
ENL.2012.0W61: English Literature I
(Beck)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.
92538 ENL3451 Topics in British Literature Face2Face M,W,F 10:30AM - 11:20AM Not Online
No Description Available
80392 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
LIT2110.0W61: World Literature I
(Beck)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

Renegades, rebels, rogues, tricksters, and the like will be the focus of this survey of early world literature. We will examine the evolution of this complicated character at various times, spaces, and places, from the Greeks to the Mayans to Shakespeare. We will investigate how these figures work within and against the prevailing ideas of their day, and what their tricks, cons, and/or challenges mean in their varied cultural contexts. Sometimes, our discussion will focus on individual characters, sometimes it may focus on authors, and sometimes the trickster element will be more implicit than explicit.

Updated: Sep 2, 2016

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu