1. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  2. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  3. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  4. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  5. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  6. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  7. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  8. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  9. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  10. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  11. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  12. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  13. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  14. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  15. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  16. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  17. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  18. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  19. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  20. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  21. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  22. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  23. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  24. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  25. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  26. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  27. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  28. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  29. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  30. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  31. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
Louise Kane

Louise Kane, Ph.D.

Louise Kane is Assistant Professor of Global Modernisms. She teaches twentieth-century literature, literary modernism, and literary theory. Her work has been published in The Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, Literature and History, and several edited collections. Her first monograph project explores the little modernist magazine as a site of transnational exchange between global writers from North America, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. She is an Editor of The Journal of Wyndham Lewis Studies.

Education

  • Ph.D. in English Literature from De Montfort University
  • B.A. in English Language and Literature from University of Oxford

Research Interests

Twentieth-century Literature; Literary Modernism; Transnational Literatures; American Literature; Asian-American Literature; British Literature; Caribbean Literature; Periodical Studies; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities

Awards

  • Professor of the Year Award (Apr. 2018)  Golden Key International Honour Society (CCGA Chapter)
  • Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded PhD Studentship, De Montfort University (2010-13)
  • Shelley Mills Essay Prize for Shakespeare Studies, University of Oxford (2009)
  • Wade-White Scholarship, University of Oxford (2007)
  • Dorothy Whitelock Prize for Old English Studies, University of Oxford (2007)
  • Oxford Opportunity Bursary, University of Oxford (2006-9)

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
20088 LIT3714 Literary Modernism Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 02:30 PM - 03:20 PM Not Online

This course explores some of modernism's best-known writers through the medium of the little magazine. Studying a range of periodicals from the early 20th century, we examine how figures like Hemingway, Stein, McKay, Williams, Loy, and Pound used little or "small" magazines as expressive, alternative forms of publication through which they shared their unique forms of modernist experiment. We begin by looking at American and European magazines before expanding our focus to read magazines from places like Japan, the Caribbean, Russia, and other diverse global locations. These readings ask us to consider how magazines were key agents in the development of expatriate literature, the Harlem Renaissance, and transnational forms of literary modernism that pose important questions about nationhood, gender, race, and identity. Assignments incorporate Digital Humanities tools for "mapping" modernism through computational and statistical, a special set of workshops on how to conduct archival research, and the opportunity to edit and produce your own literary magazine. 

18246 LIT6936 Studies in Lct Theory Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) W 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM Not Online

Ghosts and Modern Literature

This course explores representations of the supernatural and ghostly in global literature published between 1850-1950. From Haitian voodoo to Polynesian totem rituals, through to classic modern American ghost stories like Henry James's The Turn of the Screw or Latin American works like Carlos Fuentes's novella, Aura, this course asks you to consider what literary ghosts represent. Drawing on secondary theories from Freud, Jung, and Harold Bloom, we consider what it means to be a 'haunted text' and how ghosts relate to more generalized philosophical frameworks of religion, death, and types of epistemology. This course is geared toward enabling postgraduate employment, so many of the assignments we undertake are interdisciplinary in nature, encouraging you to develop skills you will need to enter fields like education, academia, advertising, publishing, or to apply to law school or PhD programs.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
90245 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 12:00 PM - 01:15 PM Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I.

Techniques of analysis, theories of interpretation, and application of critical approaches to selected works. In this course we explore everything from early philosophical approaches to literature and society (Nietzsche, Freud, Marx), mid twentieth-century theories like Formalism, Structuralism, and Poststructuralism, before venturing into studies of postcolonial, Feminist, and queer theory. We apply these theories to four primary texts: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, "Sweat" by Zora Neale Hurston, William Carlos Williams' poetry, and The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Assignments are geared toward gaining employment in a wide range of industries, and are interdisciplinary in their incorporation of undergraduate research grounded in rapidly expanding research fields like Medical Humanities, Digital Humanities, and Disability Studies. 

91956 LIT3833 Modern Asian Literature World Wide Web (W) Not Online

This course introduces you to Asian literature published between 1850 to the present day. We explore a wide range of texts from Japan, China, Korea, Vietnam, and other parts of the Far and Middle East, including authors like Haruki Murakami, Bing Xin, Sui Sin Far, and genres such as the Japanese “I” novel. The texts are provocative and sometimes controversial, with stories of love, relationships, trauma, and life’s challenges that remind us of the universality of these themes and the fact that they occur across different time periods. To prepare you for entry into fields like education, creative industries, and international relations, assignments are multimedia and interdisciplinary in nature, featuring a special "Translation Studies" in which you will translate works into English, a website production element, and the opportunity to learn how to produce your own lecture for undergraduate students. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
60948 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study World Wide Web (W) B Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I.

Techniques of analysis, theories of interpretation, and application of critical approaches to selected works. In this course we explore everything from early philosophical approaches to literature and society (Nietzsche, Freud, Marx), mid twentieth-century theories like Formalism, Structuralism, and Poststructuralism, before venturing into studies of postcolonial, Feminist, and queer theory. We apply these theories to four primary texts: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, "Sweat" by Zora Neale Hurston, William Carlos Williams' poetry, and The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Assignments are geared toward gaining employment in a wide range of industries, and are interdisciplinary in their incorporation of undergraduate research grounded in rapidly expanding research fields like Medical Humanities, Digital Humanities, and Disability Studies. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11583 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 04:30 PM - 05:45 PM Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I. Techniques of analysis, theories of interpretation, and application of critical approaches to selected works.

11403 LIT3931 Topics in World Literature Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 03:00 PM - 04:15 PM Not Online

LIT3931 Topics in World Literature 

Love, Loss, Taboo

This course explores representations of love and loss within different examples of world literature from 1850 to the present. Drawn from countries including Japan, China, Germany, Mexico, Ireland, Africa, and India, the poems, short stories, and novels we explore all deal specifically with the idea of ‘taboo’. From the forbidden desire of Bernhard Schlink's The Reader, through to early 20th-century Chinese female writers and their surprisingly forthright musings on sexuality, the course is designed to ask us provocative questions about love, loss, and what it means to be taboo.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81146 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 01:30 PM - 02:45 PM Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I. Techniques of analysis, theories of interpretation, and application of critical approaches to selected works.

81749 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 03:00 PM - 04:15 PM Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I. Techniques of analysis, theories of interpretation, and application of critical approaches to selected works.

91287 LIT3714 Literary Modernism Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Not Online

   This course explores some of modernism's best-known writers through the medium of the little magazine. Studying a range of periodicals from the early 20th century, we examine how figures like Hemingway, Stein, McKay, Williams, Loy, and Pound used little or "small" magazines as expressive, alternative forms of publication through which they shared their unique forms of modernist experiment. We begin by looking at American and European magazines before expanding our focus to read magazines from places like Japan, the Caribbean, Russia, and other diverse global locations. These readings ask us to consider how magazines were key agents in the development of expatriate literature, the Harlem Renaissance, and transnational forms of literary modernism that pose important questions about nationhood, gender, race, and identity.

Updated: Jan 3, 2019

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu