1. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  2. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  3. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  4. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  5. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  6. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  7. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  8. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  9. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  10. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  11. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  12. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  13. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  14. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
  15. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  16. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  17. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  18. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  19. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  20. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  21. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  22. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  23. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  24. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  25. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  26. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  27. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  28. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  29. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  30. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  31. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
Louise Kane

Louise Kane, Ph.D.

Louise Kane is Assistant Professor of Global Modernisms. She teaches late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century literature, literary modernism, and literary theory. Her work has been published in The Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, Literary History, and numerous edited collections. Her first monograph project explores the little modernist magazine as a site of transnational exchange between global writers from North America, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. She is an Editor of The Journal of Wyndham Lewis Studies.

Education

  • Ph.D. in English Literature from De Montfort University
  • B.A. in English Language and Literature from University of Oxford

Research Interests

Twentieth-century Literature; Literary Modernism; Transnational Literatures; American Literature; Asian-American Literature; British Literature; Caribbean Literature; Periodical Studies; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities

Awards

  • Professor of the Year Award (Apr. 2018)  Golden Key International Honour Society (CCGA Chapter)
  • Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded PhD Studentship, De Montfort University (2010-3)
  • Shelley Mills Essay Prize for Shakespearre Studies, University of Oxford (2009)
  • Wade-White Scholarship, University of Oxford (2007)
  • Dorothy Whitelock Prize for Old English Studies, University of Oxford (2007)
  • Oxford Opportunity Bursary, University of Oxford (2006-9)

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11583 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face2Face Tu,Th 4:30PM - 5:45PM Not Online
No Description Available
11403 LIT3931 Topics in World Literature Face2Face Tu,Th 3:00PM - 4:15PM Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81146 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face2Face Tu,Th 1:30PM - 2:45PM Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I. Techniques of analysis, theories of interpretation, and application of critical approaches to selected works.

81749 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Face2Face Tu,Th 3:00PM - 4:15PM Not Online

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I. Techniques of analysis, theories of interpretation, and application of critical approaches to selected works.

91287 LIT3714 Literary Modernism Face2Face Tu,Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM Not Online

   This course explores some of modernism's best-known writers through the medium of the little magazine. Studying a range of periodicals from the early 20th century, we examine how figures like Hemingway, Stein, McKay, Williams, Loy, and Pound used little or "small" magazines as expressive, alternative forms of publication through which they shared their unique forms of modernist experiment. We begin by looking at American and European magazines before expanding our focus to read magazines from places like Japan, the Caribbean, Russia, and other diverse global locations. These readings ask us to consider how magazines were key agents in the development of expatriate literature, the Harlem Renaissance, and transnational forms of literary modernism that pose important questions about nationhood, gender, race, and identity.

No courses found for Summer 2018.

No courses found for Spring 2018.

No courses found for Fall 2017.

Updated: Sep 20, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu