1. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  2. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children’s Literature by Tison Pugh
  3. According to the Gospel of Haunted Women
  4. Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  5. Intercultural Communication by Houman Sadri and Madelyn Flammia
  6. Getaway Girl by Terry Thaxton
  7. The Rhetorical Nature of XML by J.D. Applen and Rudy McDaniel
  8. Writing for the Web: Composing, •Coding, and Constructing Web Sites
  9. The Season of Risks by Susan Hubbard
  10. Oye What I'm Gonna Tell You by Milanés
  11. Crossing The Creek by Anna Lillios
  12. Problem Novels by Anna Maria Jones
  13. Drawing on the Victorians, edited by Anna Maria Jones
  14. The Heaven of Animals by James Poissant
  15. The Flight of the Kuaka by Donald Stap
  16. As If, poems by Russ Kesler
  17. The Terrible Wife by Terry Thaxton
  18. The Society of S by Susan Hubbard
  19. Everyday Chica by Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
  20. Transversal Ecocritical Praxis by Patrick D. Murphy
  21. Ecocritical Explorations in Literary and Cultural Studies by Patrick D. Murphy
  22. People Get Ready by Kevin Meehan
  23. Rattlesnakes and the Moon by Darlin Neal
  24. The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown by Mark L. Kamrath
  25. The Zero Theorem by Pat Rushin
  26. Lizard Man by David James Poissant
  27. Elegant Punk by Darlin Neal
  28. Virtual Teams in Higher Education by Flammia
  29. Mud Song by Terry Thaxton
  30. The Year of Disappearances by Susan Hubbard
  31. Collecte Writings of Charles Brockden Brown edited by Mark L. Kamrath
Micah Dean Hicks

Micah Dean Hicks, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Creative Writing from Florida State University (2015)
  • M.A. in Creative Writing from University of Southern Mississippi (2011)
  • B.A. in English from Southern Arkansas University (2008)

Research Interests

Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Scriptwriting, Comics, Fairy Tale Studies, Science Fiction and Fantasy, Creative Writing Pedagogy.

Selected Publications

Books

  • Forthcoming Break the Bodies, Haunt the Bones. Boston, John Joseph Adams Books-Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2019.
  • Electricity and Other Dreams. Milwaukee, New American Press, 2013.

Creative Publications

  • Forthcoming "Church of Birds." The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, edited by N.K. Jemisin, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
18341 CRW3053 Thry & Practice Creative Wrtng World Wide Web (W) Not Online

This course has a few broad aims. First, you will understand what successful contemporary fiction, poetry, and nonfiction looks like through reading prize anthologies and other texts. You will also gain familiarity with craft terms and technical concepts that will enhance your understanding of the literature you read. Aside from analyzing literature and craft, this course will also be your introduction to the faculty of UCF's creative writing program and some opportunities available to students. Finally, you will learn about various issues and controversies within the publishing industry and consider how you can be successful in your career.

18343 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM Not Online

The aim of this class is the help students understand what makes an effective story. We will read craft advice, fiction by contemporary American authors in a variety of styles, and we will—most importantly—read stories written by you and your peers. If you are in this class, I will assume you are passionate about writing, that you are serious about wanting to tell stories, and that you want to tell them better.

18107 CRW3950 Cypress Dome Editorship Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM Not Online

This is a two-semester course commitment, beginning in the fall. In the fall, students will actively learn the editing process—from promotion to publication—and, in the spring, produce and publish Cypress Dome, a literary magazine that features the creative literary and artistic work of selected UCF students.  Students read all submissions, determine inclusions, edit accepted manuscripts, actively engage in creative design and production (including InDesign certification), and promote the magazine. In this highly collaborative course, students must be comfortable with—and committed to—a team approach and the fulfillment of individualized, independent tasks. Students are accepted by application only and must include a reference from a professor. Preference frequently given to students who have excelled in introductory and advanced writing workshops, but all applications considered. To apply, email micah.hicks@ucf.edu.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
90562 CRW3053 Thry & Practice Creative Wrtng World Wide Web (W) Not Online

This course has a few broad aims. First, you will understand what successful contemporary fiction, poetry, and nonfiction looks like through reading prize anthologies and other texts. You will also gain familiarity with craft terms and technical concepts that will enhance your understanding of the literature you read. Aside from analyzing literature and craft, this course will also be your introduction to the faculty of UCF's creative writing program and some opportunities available to students. Finally, you will learn about various issues and controversies within the publishing industry and consider how you can be successful in your career.

90459 CRW3950 Cypress Dome Editorship Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) Th 04:30 PM - 05:45 PM Not Online

This is a two-semester course commitment, beginning in the fall. In the fall, students will actively learn the editing process—from promotion to publication—and, in the spring, produce and publish Cypress Dome, a literary magazine that features the creative literary and artistic work of selected UCF students.  Students read all submissions, determine inclusions, edit accepted manuscripts, actively engage in creative design and production (including InDesign certification), and promote the magazine. In this highly collaborative course, students must be comfortable with—and committed to—a team approach and the fulfillment of individualized, independent tasks. Students are accepted by application only and must include a reference from a professor. Preference frequently given to students who have excelled in introductory and advanced writing workshops, but all applications considered.

To apply, email micah.hicks@ucf.edu.

90532 CRW6025 Adv Graduate Writing Workshop Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu 06:00 PM - 08:50 PM Not Online

This graduate-level fiction workshop will be primarily generative, asking you to produce a lot of new work over the course of the semester. Classes will begin with brief writing exercises to help you generate ideas. Most students will turn in five short stories over the course of the class and choose two of those to workshop and one to revise. Students who are more interested in novel-writing may instead be allowed to draft, workshop, and revise a novel excerpt instead of stories, pending instructor approval. In addition to asking what makes fiction successful in terms of character, language, and narrative, we will also discuss how to ethically write outside our own perspective. A major concern of the course across everything we read and draft will be to understand how to write moving stories that create a strong emotional response in the reader.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
60894 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) A Not Online

The aim of this class is the help students understand what makes an effective story. We will read craft advice, fiction by contemporary American authors in a variety of styles, and we will—most importantly—read stories written by you and your peers. If you are in this class, I will assume that you are passionate about writing, that you are serious about wanting to tell stories, and that you want to tell them better.

61103 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) B Not Online

The aim of this class is the help students understand what makes an effective story. We will read craft advice, fiction by contemporary American authors in a variety of styles, and we will—most importantly—read stories written by you and your peers. If you are in this class, I will assume that you are passionate about writing, that you are serious about wanting to tell stories, and that you want to tell them better.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11562 CRW3053 Thry & Practice Creative Wrtng World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor and a grade of “C” (2.0) or better in ENC 1102, or C.I. Examination of the genres and readings in contemporary creative writing with attention to literary technique, and discussion of issues in the field.

11418 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor grade of C (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and CRW 3053, or C.I. An intermediate level fiction writing workshop for English majors; group analysis and criticism; close reading of contemporary fiction and fiction theory.

19260 CRW3120 Fiction Writing Workshop World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor grade of C (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and CRW 3053, or C.I. An intermediate level fiction writing workshop for English majors; group analysis and criticism; close reading of contemporary fiction and fiction theory.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81493 CRW3053 Thry & Practice Creative Wrtng World Wide Web (W) Not Online

PR: English major or minor and a grade of “C” (2.0) or better in ENC 1102, or C.I. Examination of the genres and readings in contemporary creative writing with attention to literary technique, and discussion of issues in the field.

81738 CRW3610 Writing Scripts Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Not Online

PR: English major or minor and grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and

CRW 3053, or C.I. Theory and practice of writing scripts for film and TV.

92636 CRW3610 Writing Scripts Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 01:30 PM - 02:45 PM Not Online

PR: English major or minor and grade of “C” (2.0) or better required in CRW 3013 and

CRW 3053, or C.I. Theory and practice of writing scripts for film and TV.

Updated: Sep 19, 2018

Department of English • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-5596 • Fax: 407-823-3300 • English@ucf.edu