Farrah Cato

Research Interests

  • World Literature
  • American Literature, especially 19th-century slave and women's literature
  • Women's Studies & Feminist Theory
  • Womanist Studies
  • Magical Realism
  • Speculative Fiction, Sci-Fi, & Fantasy

Awards

  • 2016 CAH Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award
  • 2015 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award
  • 2012 Online Schools Top 20 Latin & Hispanic Professors in Florida
  • 2010 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award
  • 2010 CAH Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
17580 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

Renegades, rebels, rogues, tricksters, and the like will be the focus of this survey of early world literature. We will examine the evolution of this complicated character at various times, spaces, and places, from the Greeks to the Mayans to Shakespeare. We will investigate how these figures work within and against the prevailing ideas of their day, and what their tricks, cons, and/or challenges mean in their varied cultural contexts. Sometimes, our discussion will focus on individual characters, sometimes it may focus on authors, and sometimes the trickster element will be more implicit than explicit.

18468 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable

LIT 3932 may be repeated for credit when the content is different.

This section of Topics in Popular Fiction is subtitled “Tales from the Other(ed) Side: Literary Re-visions.” We will read contemporary works that are based on a variety of literary texts, including Greek & Roman epics, fairy & folk tales, myths, legends, and more. Not only are these literary retellings of well-known literature, but they are also texts that emphasize the voice of the racialized, gendered, or sexualized “Other.” It isn’t necessary for you to know all of the “original” texts before you read these retellings. One of our collective goals this semester will be to explore those “old” texts and to consider how and why these “new” versions might still be important and relevant.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
91920 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable

In this course, we will survey American literature from its beginnings to the middle of the nineteenth century.  We will consider the voices of men and women, the enslaved and the free, the colonized and the colonizer.  Through first-hand accounts, journals, lectures, novels, and poetry, we will:

  • explore how early Americans viewed and responded to the various events of their day,
  • consider how these writers try to make sense of their world and their roles within it,
  • examine how these texts reflect Pratt’s notion of the “contact zone,”
  • consider how these texts reflect a constantly-evolving definition of what counts as “America” and what it means to be an American,
  • reflect on the continued relevance (and impact) of these texts today
90867 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

LIT 3932 may be repeated for credit when the content is different.

This online section of Topics in Popular Fiction will focus on Speculative Fiction (fantasy, science fiction, magical realism, and more) written by women authors such as Ursula Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, Octavia Butler, and N.K. Jemisin.  Writers such as these typically ask “what if?” about various social and political issues, and our primary role this semester will be to consider the larger implications of their questions, typically—though not exclusively—through discussions about power, politics, community & the individual, gender, race & ethnicity, or how we use language.  We will think about what it means to read popular fiction today (in a college course, no less) as well as its larger cultural, social, and political implications.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61066 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) A Unavailable

In this course, we will survey American literature from its beginnings to the middle of the nineteenth century.  We will consider the voices of men and women, the enslaved and the free, the colonized and the colonizer.  Through first-hand accounts, journals, lectures, novels, and poetry, we will:

  • explore how early Americans viewed and responded to the various events of their day,
  • consider how these writers try to make sense of their world and their roles within it,
  • examine how these texts reflect Pratt’s notion of the “contact zone,”
  • consider how these texts reflect a constantly-evolving definition of what counts as “America” and what it means to be an American,
  • reflect on the continued relevance (and impact) of these texts today
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19291 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable

This section of Topics in Popular Fiction is subtitled “Tales from the Other(ed) Side: Literary Re-visions.” We will read works that are based on a variety of literary texts; fairy tales, Greek & Roman epics (including, but not limited to, Homer), and even Shakespeare are all fair game. Our course theme will work in two ways: not only are these literary reimaginings of well-known literature, but they are also texts that emphasize the voice of the racialized, gendered, or sexualized “Other.” We will consider what it means to re-envision a text in such a way, why it might be important to do so, and how these re(en)visionings change the ways we read and think about “classic” literature.

19292 LIT3933 Literature and Law World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This section of Literature and Law will examine textual representations of literary (in)justice.  We’ll encounter vigilantes, avengers, and other provocative figures who urge us to think critically about how we define justice, how we put those definitions into practice, and what happens when those definitions are challenged.  Through novels, short stories, and essays, we will wrestle with a host of ethical and moral conundrums, such as: 

  • What counts as justice? 
  • To what extent is justice “blind”?
  • Who determines fair and just punishment for lawbreakers?  Who determines fair and just payment for victims?
  • Who determines the value of human life?  Who decides which lives are worth saving?
  • How do we decide which laws are worth following?
  • What is an “unjust” law?  What, if any, consequences should there be for someone who breaks one?
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81732 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

In this course, we will survey American literature from its beginnings to the middle of the nineteenth century.  We will consider the voices of men and women, the enslaved and the free, the colonized and the colonizer.  Through first-hand accounts, journals, lectures, novels, and poetry, we will:

  • explore how early Americans viewed and responded to the various events of their day,
  • consider how these writers try to make sense of their world and their roles within it,
  • examine how these texts reflect Pratt’s notion of the “contact zone,”
  • consider how these texts reflect a constantly-evolving definition of what counts as “America” and what it means to be an American,
  • reflect on the continued relevance (and impact) of these texts today
80362 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

Renegades, rebels, rogues, tricksters, and the like will be the focus of this survey of early world literature. We will examine the evolution of this complicated character at various times, spaces, and places, from the Greeks to the Mayans to Shakespeare. We will investigate how these figures work within and against the prevailing ideas of their day, and what their tricks, cons, and/or challenges mean in their varied cultural contexts. Sometimes, our discussion will focus on individual characters, sometimes it may focus on authors, and sometimes the trickster element will be more implicit than explicit.

Updated: Oct 9, 2019