Kathleen Hohenleitner

Kathleen Hohenleitner, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in British and Irish Literature from University of Notre Dame (1998)

Research Interests

British Literature, Irish Literature, Literary Theory, Modern Drama

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
18378 ENL4303 British Authors World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

The British author we will focus on in this class is Jane Austen. We will read all 6 of her published novels: Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma and Persuasion and a short biography of Austen. We will read a novel and one or two articles every two weeks. There will be weekly discussions, weekly quizzes, a 10-page research essay and a final.

17696 LIT2120 World Literature Ⅱ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

This class will cover literature written in various languages and translated into English. We will read texts from a variety of genres and cultures from the 17th century until the present. This class fulfills the Cultural and Historical foundations of the GEP curriculum. Authors include Moliere, Ibsen, Kafka, Borges, Hasanat and Nwakanma. This is a literature class, but does not count as a Historical class in the LIT track curriculum.

19611 LIT4184 Irish Literature Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 09:30 AM - 10:20 AM Unavailable

Students will gain a cultural and historical perspective on the work of Irish-born writers by considering the implications of power, gender, language and identity in postcolonial writing. Students will improve analytical writing and research skills by writing a series of thesis-driven research assignments. We will read poetry, drama and novels by such as Yeats, Joyce, Synge, Brian Friel, Seamus Heaney, Anne Enright, and Nuala NiDhomhnaill.

This is a Mediated Class that meets on Monday and Wednesday and will have an online assignment due every Friday at 11:59PM. Assignments include: midterm, final, research essay, reading literary criticism, in-class assignments.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
90763 ENG3821 What's Next for English Majors Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM Unavailable

This class aims to help English majors prepare for life after graduation, specifically aimed at but not limited to new transfer students from FL state colleges. English majors have valuable skills that they need to articulate to potential employers. This class will familiarize students with strategies to help them succeed on campus and beyond.

The class meets twice a week. Guest speakers from various campus offices such as Career Services, Law and Graduate programs, and UCF alums from the work force will prepare students for success.

Students will complete a rhetorical analysis of iob ads, research into the impact of the Humanities on the job market, explore their own internet self branding process; practice an “elevator speech”; and create an online portfolio that will be tailored to each student’s individual post graduation plans.

89268 LIT2120 World Literature Ⅱ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

Course description: This class will cover literature written in various languages and translated into English. We will read texts from a variety of genres and cultures from the 17th century until the present. This class fulfills the Cultural and Historical foundations of the GEP curriculum. Authors include Moliere, Ibsen, Kafka, Borges, Hasanat and Nwakanma. This is a literature class, but does not count as a Historical class in the LIT track curriculum.

90938 LIT3212 Research & Writing About Lit World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

Course Description: This fully online class focuses on the research process. The class aims to introduce students to literary research, reading and evaluating articles and other literary sources, incorporating cited material, formatting the essay according to MLA style. We will read primary and secondary sources, as well as practice using Library Databases and Open Education Sources.  Students will practice disseminating their work with peers and be encouraged to explore publishing opportunities, contests, research showcases, and other opportunities to share their research.

Text: The Craft of Research, Wayne Booth, Gregory Colomb, Joseph M. Williams, Joseph Bizup, William Fitzgerald. 4th edition. Chicago UP, 2016.

We will read un-copyrighted short stories and play online from which we will draw our writing topics.

Assignments include readings, discussion posts, quizzes, research essay and drafts, annotated bibliography, peer reviews, final exam.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61148 LIT4043 Modern Drama As Literature World Wide Web (W) B Unavailable

In this short summer class we will read Western drama from the 20th and 21st centuries. Texts will include Susan Glaspell, Bert Brecht, Samuel Beckett, David Mamet, David Henry Hwang, August Wilson, Tony Kushner, and Caryl Churchill, among others. Students will write a short research essay and write a performance review of a play or film adaptation of a play.

Textbook: Norton Anthology of Drama, vol. 2, 3rd edition.

Assignments: Online discussion, quizzes, midterm, research essay, final exam

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11613 ENG3821 What's Next for English Majors Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM Unavailable

   English Majors, you have skills! This class aims to help English majors explore options for employment after graduation. This class will familiarize students with strategies to help them succeed on campus and beyond.

   The class meets once a week and has an M component with weekly online assignments. Guest speakers from various campus offices such as Career Services, graduate Faculty, and UCF alums from various English-related careers will prepare students for success. Attendance is an important part of the grade, because of the many guest speakers.

   Students will complete rhetorical analyses of job ads, research into the impact of the Humanities on the job market, practice an “elevator speech”; and create an online portfolio of writing that will be tailored to each student’s individual post graduation plans. Portfolios may include Statements of Purpose, cover letters, resumes or more creative portfolios.

11625 ENL4303 British Authors World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

We will read the major works of Jane Austen and consider what they reveal about her society and her evolving narrative style. We will consider such topics as language, class, irony, narration, colonialism and film adaptation.

This fully online class will include weekly reading quizzes, online video lectures, participatory discussions (minimum of 2 posts per week), midterm, final, research essay.

20088 LIT3212 Research & Writing About Lit World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

PR: Grade of “C” (2.0) or better in ENC 1102 or C.I. Research, writing, and critical analysis skills applicable to upper-level literature courses.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81023 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

An introduction to Literary Theory in the 20th and 21st centuries including New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Marxist, New Historicism and Postcolonial Theory. We will read Charlotte Bronte’s canonical novel Jane Eyre and consider this versatile text through the lenses of the various theories we’ll study.

This class is entirely online. Students should be prepared to read a rigorous textbook on their own and to take responsibility for their own learning. This class is best suited for students who are self-motivated, disciplined, and organized. Narrated power point videos will deliver brief summaries of the theories and weekly online discussions will apply them to the novel. Assignments include reading quizzes; discussions; research essay; midterm, peer-editing; final exam.

81803 ENG3821 What's Next for English Majors Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) Tu 09:00 AM - 10:15 AM Unavailable

English Majors, you have skills! This class aims to help English majors explore options for employment after graduation. This class will familiarize students with strategies to help them succeed on campus and beyond.

The class meets once a week and has an M component with weekly online assignments. Guest speakers from various campus offices such as Career Services, graduate Faculty, and UCF alums from various English-related careers will prepare students for success. Attendance is an important part of the grade, because of the many guest speakers.

Students will complete rhetorical analyses of job ads, research into the impact of the Humanities on the job market, practice an “elevator speech”; and create an online portfolio of writing that will be tailored to each student’s individual post graduation plans. Portfolios may include Statements of Purpose, cover letters, resumes or more creative portfolios.

91720 LIT3212 Research & Writing About Lit World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

Course Description: This fully online class focuses on the research process. The class aims to introduce students to literary research, reading and evaluating articles and other literary sources, incorporating cited material, formatting the essay according to MLA style. We will read primary and secondary sources, as well as practice using Library Databases and Open Education Sources.  Students will practice disseminating their work with peers and be encouraged to explore publishing opportunities, contests, research showcases, and other opportunities to share their research.

Text: Reading and Writing about Literature: A Portable Guide. 4th edition. Editors, Janet Gardner and Joanne Diaz. NY: Bedford, St. Martin’s. 2017.

We will read familiar American short stories, poems and a play from the textbook from which we will draw our writing topics.

Assignments include readings, discussion posts, quizzes, research essay and drafts, annotated bibliography, peer reviews, final exam.

Updated: Oct 9, 2019