Francois-Xavier Gleyzon, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. from University of Lancaster - United Kingdom (2008)

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19602 ENL3220 English Renais Poetry Prose World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

This course introduces you to the authors, forms, and major themes that vitalize English Renaissance poetry and prose. Our readings will mainly be focused on themes designed to provide us with ingress into the poetry and prose, culture and historical vitality of the period—‘truth’, ‘love’, ‘gender ‘revolution and class’, ‘engendering the city’. We will be reading cross-sections from works by many authors (Thomas More, Thomas Wyatt, Edmund Spenser, Robert Burton, George Herbert, William Shakespeare, and John Milton) to explore these themes from as many angles as possible. We will explore the similarities, the lines of consensus, of shared languages and beliefs, between the different writers, but we will also be keen to observe and analyze differences. Several segments of the course focus on the re-construction and re-presentation of the human body - including a critical investigation of anatomy as a visual concept (the Icarian/cartographic gaze), and how early cartographic practice reveals a striking iconic correlation between maps and the (female) body (Robert Burton). Specific seminars will also explore how the acts of creating/writing are themselves devices for fashioning the body and identity (Wyatt), positioning the self within a social and religious order as well as defining the otherness of gender (Shakespeare).

19605 ENL4333 Shakespeare Studies Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 03:30 PM - 04:20 PM Unavailable

We will read plays and a narrative poems from Shakespeare’s career as chief dramatist for The Lord Chamberlain’s Men and, later, The King’s Men. Our class discussions will involve close analysis of Shakespeare’s language, his culture, and the various moral, political, and aesthetic issues raised in the plays and poetry. We will favour a thematic over chronological order of reading so that we can build on our progressive examination of king and kinship, gender, love, friendship and reciprocal obligation; also, in relation to these issues, we’ll examine domestic and political tyranny—and of course, revenge and moral redemption. This subject is also at the junction of Literature and Cinema as well as other art forms such as paintings of the Renaissance period. The course has as its aim to offer an innovative interdisciplinary analysis of Shakespeare as well as an overview of current philosophical approaches. Finally, the course argues for the critical importance of thinking Shakespeare now. We will therefore consider what Shakespeare has to offer now and in the future and how We will therefore consider what Shakespeare has to offer now and in the future, and how Shakespeare’s texts can arm students “with audacity” so as to make logical, compelling arguments, in speech and in writing. Plays will be supplemented by readings in Shakespearean criticism and in contemporary theory.

18469 LIT3933 Literature and Law Face to Face Instruction (P) M,W,F 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM Unavailable

I Stand for Law: Renaissance/Early Modern Literature and Legal Imagination explores how Renaissance and Early Modern writers (Machiavelli, More, Shakespeare, and Milton) deal with legal subject matter in order to articulate ideas about personhood, nationhood, and political identity. During the semester, we will read fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries texts (fiction and non fiction) in order to examine how these “legal stories, texts or plays” offer a sharp and incisive critique of the relationship between Law and Morality, Sovereignty and Right. The course has as its aim to offer an innovative interdisciplinary analysis of Renaissance/Early Modern texts in relation to legal matters as well as an overview of current philosophical approaches. We will consider what those “legal” plays and texts have to offer now and in the future, and how our past still informs our present and vice versa. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
92843 ENL3220 English Renais Poetry Prose Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 03:00 PM - 04:15 PM Unavailable

This course introduces you to the authors, forms, and major themes that vitalize English Renaissance poetry and prose. Our readings will mainly be focused on themes designed to provide us with ingress into the poetry and prose, culture and historical vitality of the period—‘truth’, ‘love’, ‘gender ‘revolution and class’, ‘engendering the city’. We will be reading cross-sections from works by many authors (Thomas More, Thomas Wyatt, Edmund Spenser, Robert Burton, George Herbert, William Shakespeare, and John Milton) to explore these themes from as many angles as possible. We will explore the similarities, the lines of consensus, of shared languages and beliefs, between the different writers, but we will also be keen to observe and analyze differences. Several segments of the course focus on the re-construction and re-presentation of the human body - including a critical investigation of anatomy as a visual concept (the Icarian/cartographic gaze), and how early cartographic practice reveals a striking iconic correlation between maps and the (female) body (Robert Burton). Specific seminars will also explore how the acts of creating/writing are themselves devices for fashioning the body and identity (Wyatt), positioning the self within a social and religious order as well as defining the otherness of gender (Shakespeare).

90144 LIT6216 Issues in Literary Study Face to Face Instruction (P) Th 06:00 PM - 08:50 PM Unavailable

Issues in Literary Study/Visual Shakespeares - LIT6216: “Drama is first and foremost a Visual Art” (Al Pacino, Sight and Sound, 2007). This course explores such issues as the way the visual contests the printed word, or the way it figures class and gender issues, or occupies the spaces of theatricality, fashion, landscape, the marketplace and the production of texts. It examines the process of translating Shakespeare’s language into images, and offers specific ways of both understanding/penetrating and visualizing Shakespeare’s world.  Shakespeare’s stage and concern was indeed The Globe, and central to the goal of this course is the careful scrutiny of Shakespeare’s plays in relation both to early modern visual culture and to modern film versions and their world-wide reception. Undertaking close readings of specific Shakespeare’s texts as well as visual artefacts such as films and paintings, the course provides a unique insight into Shakespeare and Early Modern’s visual culture and helps refashion, re-map broader issues that engage the then emergent status of cultural and religious identity, nation, and individuality. Finally, the course argues for the critical importance of thinking Shakespeare now. We will therefore consider what Shakespeare has to offer now (in an age of visual/global cultures) and in the future. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61887 ENL4333 Shakespeare Studies World Wide Web (W) B Unavailable

We will read plays and a narrative poems from Shakespeare’s career as chief dramatist for The Lord Chamberlain’s Men and, later, The King’s Men. Our class discussions will involve close analysis of Shakespeare’s language, his culture, and the various moral, political, and aesthetic issues raised in the plays and poetry. We will favour a thematic over chronological order of reading so that we can build on our progressive examination of king and kinship, gender, love, friendship and reciprocal obligation; also, in relation to these issues, we’ll examine domestic and political tyranny—and of course, revenge and moral redemption. This subject is also at the junction of Literature and Cinema as well as other art forms such as paintings of the Renaissance period. The course has as its aim to offer an innovative interdisciplinary analysis of Shakespeare as well as an overview of current philosophical approaches. Finally, the course argues for the critical importance of thinking Shakespeare now. We will therefore consider what Shakespeare has to offer now and in the future and how We will therefore consider what Shakespeare has to offer now and in the future, and how Shakespeare’s texts can arm students “with audacity” so as to make logical, compelling arguments, in speech and in writing. Plays will be supplemented by readings in Shakespearean criticism and in contemporary theory

No courses found for Spring 2019.

No courses found for Fall 2018.

Updated: Dec 6, 2018